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CANNED! 

Downside of the recycling center eviction pio 


ON A MISSION MISSION BEEP BEEP! 

Underground art icon surfaces with a book P23 | ‘Honk If You’re Horny’: retro porn at YBCA P24 



CELEBRATING 46 YEARS 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN I SFBG.COM 

DECEMBER 5 - 11, 2012 I VOL. 47, NO. 10 I FREE 


Get 
fierce 
with 
winter 
fashion 
— club-ready 
stunners and cold 
weather must-haves 
from local stores, page 18 


GUARDIAN FASHION PHOTO BY CABURE BONUGLI (SHOT IN THE CITY) 


ON RYAN: BILLY REID ASYMMETRICAL SHIRT, MILL MERCANTILE; HAT, GLOVES, ARCAM 
PHOTOS OF SAN FRANCISCO BY REYNALDO CAYETANO JR. 


I 'V '«?• ' 

Hi 




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Goat Hill Wizza 


THE GUARDIAN PRESENTS THE 24™ ANNUAL 

GOLDIES 

GUARDIAN OUTSTANDING LOCAL DISCOVERY AWARDS 


On Wednesday, November 28, the Guardian honored up and coming talent 
in the performing and visual arts with a private awards ceremony 111 Minna. 
For the 24th year, we saluted local and cutting edge talent, and then partied 
down with the winners and friends at the after party. 

Congratulations to: Music The Mallard | Dance Joe Landini and the Garage 
| Film Jamie Meltzer | Performance Mica Sigourney | Visual Art Brett Amory 
j Theater Anna Ishida | Music 5kinandbone5 | Theater Piano Fight | Music 
WATERS | Lifetime Achievement Shawl-Anderson Dance Studio 

Special thanks to DJ Bus Station John, Dr. Zebroski, Kat Marie Yoaz, and 
Blake Karamazov 


PHOTOS: CLAYTON HUMPHRIES & JULIA SZENREI 


THE GUARDIAN WOULD ALSO LIKE TO THANK OUR GOLDIES SPONSORS: 


hey, cookie! 


LUJ 111 MINNA 

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Uil GALLERY 




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succulence www.thesucculence.com 

life av^d garde ia . 


Let it snow. Let it snow. 

• # # 

Let it precipitate 

polygonal ice crystals. 

* _ # # 





Tis the Season for Science 

Now through January 6 

Share the wonder of winter, and see the amazing ways animals 
adapt to the season. With indoor snow, live reindeer and more. 


Get tickets at calacademy.org. 



CALIFORNIA 
ACADEMY OF 

SCIENCES 

Gulden Gate Park 



Ouv weekly music. Column explores evev-y 
drunken eomer oT -tbe San Fvandisdo 
musie sdene, -finding scenes wi"tbin scenes, 
•from SoT"t ("toTu) adous-tid Tolk "to bard 
(whiskey) -tkvasky funk, and everything 

in between. lADm AM 


UPCOMING 

GUARDIAN 
SPECIAL ISSUES 


YEAR IN MUSIC 

DECEMBER 12 




YEAR IN FILM 

DECEMBER 26 



FOR ADVERTISING INQUIRIES 
CONTACT ADMANAGERS@ SFBG.COM 
OR CALL 415.487.4600 

GUARDIAN 

SFBG*CQM 


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■5iHS*d 55C <k rroca at any stores tetw«n l&frtf-lZftUlSlngel j 0*hx*a1 card lor 53Q ofl gour purcnasa crT mrui/lRI ir^nc I'fllTI 

550 of more \m\mtn i wfrttifrl3, [tewonl applies to Y&ns Bwi d mtfUiandfM mly at ftns US reEwi Mhm W WW, V 0 1 * 3 ■ vU 11 ■ 

PPwrt m tinn tor cwn fll— <rtl, 

Check out www.vans.coni for a Vans location near ycw- 


EDITORIALS 


NEWS 


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PICKS 


ARTS + CULTURE 


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DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 / SFBG.COM 3 


THIS IS VANS. THE ORIGINAL SINCE 1966. 




















































EDITORIALS 


DEC. 5,2012 


“LOOK AT THE SKY AND PRAY FOR MAGIC.” - LARRY HARVEY 


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GUARDIAN 

INTELLIGENCE 

What you 
need to know 


BURNING MAN 
BECKONS THE 
ALIENS 


Burning Man founder Larry 
Harvey sent burners scrambling 
to Wikipedia lastweekwhen he 
announced the art theme forthe 
2013 event, “Cargo Cult,” and 
posed the intriguing question, 
“Who is John Frum?” Perhaps 
the most esoteric theme in all of 
the years that Harvey has applied 
them to this 27-year-old annual 
countercultural celebration, this 
one draws from stories of indig¬ 
enous cultures that have been 
awed by the advanced technology 
of American visitors, from cults 
and ritualsto beckon them back, 
morphing into our own modern fas¬ 
cination with the cargo dropped on 
us by mysterious visitors, whether 
they be multinational corporations 
or extraterrestrial life forms. As 
Harvey wrote, “all we can do is look 
beyond the sky and pray for magic 
that will keep consumption flow¬ 
ing.” Ruminate on that one, artists 
and party people. 


4 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 


NEWS | FOOD + DRINK | PICKS | ARTS + CULTURE | MUSIC LISTINGS | STAGE LISTINGS | ON THE CHEAP 


A NEVIUS SCOOP: 
PEOPLE HAVE 
TATTOOS! 


FRIDAY/7 

COALITION ON HOMELESSNESS 
CELEBRATES 25 YEARS 

Polish Club 3040 22nd street SF 
$15-$75 D.J. Glen Castro, live music 
by Chicken Paw, Mexican dinner by 
Justice Warrior Madres. Therearen’t 
many groups in thecitythatdoas 
much good, for as many people, on 
the ground, for as little money asthe 
Coalition on Homelessness. Founded in 
1987, when city officials were still try¬ 
ing to figure out what to do with all those 
people driven by Ronald Reagan out of 
homes and onto the streets, the coali¬ 
tion provides support and advocacy for 
the often voiceless. Oh, and it publishes 
the Street Sheet, cohsf.org 

SATURDAY/15 

MERCADO DE CAMBIO/THE PO, 

STO’- HOLIDAY ART MARKET & 
KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE 

2940 16th street #301. 3pm-7pm. 

Free. Forthe fourth year, POOR 
Magazine/Prensa POBRE hoststhis 
collaboration of micro-business, art, 
performance and community. It’s a 
grassroots resistance to the corporate- 
run, mall-based, consumerdriven, gift¬ 
buying frenzies seeded by the big-box 
stores. Performances, original artwork, 
jewelry, and products by indigenous 
artists and the POOR press books col¬ 
lection. poormagazine.org 


FILM LISTINGS j CLASSIFIEDS 


DON’T MAKE THE DEAL, DAVID 

Willie Brown, the conflict-riddled Chronicle columnist, managed, some¬ 
where between his odes to Dim Sum and the Macy’s holiday windows, to 
leak out a bit of interesting political gossip, and we’ve heard it elsewhere 
around town: Sup. David Chiu cuts a deal with Sup. Scott Wiener, supports 
Wiener for board president — and Wiener backs Chiu for state Assembly. 
The idea: Chiu could get Wiener hissix votes, and Wiener would helpChiu 
cut into the solid LGBT constituency of Sup. David Campos, who also 
wants the Assembly seat. Chiu told us not to believe everything we read in 
Willie Brown’s column, which is good advice — but the deal wouldn’t make 
that much sense anyway. Wiener’s folks are too conservative to vote for 
Camposanyway. And by supporting Wiener, Chiu would lose bigwiththe 
left in an East Side progressive district. 


WIENER FILES CHARGES IN POTTY-ROOM PHOTO 

The oddest chapter in the ongoing feud between Sup. Scott Wiener and blogger, shit-dis- 
turber, and often-annoying activist Michael Petrelis has led to criminal charges. Petrelis, 
it turns out, happened upon Wiener (by chance or intent) inaCity Hall men’sroomand 
tried to snap a picture of the supervisor usingthe urinal. The camera didn’t work, though, 
and by the time he got an image, Wiener’s wiener was long away; hejustgota photo of 
the unhappy pol standing at the sink with his toothbrush. Pointless pic — and really bad 
behavior by Petrelis; we have our fights with Wiener, but the guy deserves the right to piss in 
peace. No First Amendment rights here — anyone has a reasonable expectation of privacy 
in a bathroom, and Petrelis needs to get a grip and stick that camera someplace 
where it can’t do any harm. 

Still, Wiener’s response — he called the sheriff 
and is pressing criminal charges — seems a 
bit overblown. Does Wiener — or anyone else 
— really want this to go to trial? 


THE FIZZLING 
RECALL 


SUP. COHEN’S BEST FRIENDS 


Check outthe Host Committee listfora Dec. 13 “birthday fundraiser” for Sup. Malia Cohen, 
who isn’t up for re-election for another two years. Every bad actor in town seems to be in 
on the action: Ron Conway, the Police Officers Association, anti-tenant activist Brooke 
Turner, two conservative unions (UHW and the Teamsters)... it’s a rogue’s gallery of anti¬ 
progressive forces. Ticket prices start at $2,000. And the checks can be made out to 
Malia Cohen for DCCC 2012 - a committee for a race that’s long over. 

■' 


Why has the San Francisco 
Democratic Party delayed, and 
delayed again, then pretty much 
punted on a resolution supporting 
a recall of Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi? 
Easy - nobody on the panel wants 
to deal with it. The wiser heads 
seem to have made the case that 
the lastthingthe DCCC needs now 
is a recall fight. That seems to be 
the spirit in a lot of the city, where 
people of all political stripes are 
ready to move on. 

THE OTHER BARRIO 

A short story by Alejandro 
Murguia, SF’s poet laureate and 
Guardian columnist, has been 
made into a movie (produced in 
part by former Guardian photog 
Lou Dematteis; old home week 
here). It’s called “The Other 
Barrio,” and it’s a noir tale that has 
as a tagline, “the city is changing 
.... neighborhood by neighbor¬ 
hood, block by block, bar by bar 
... change with it or fight fire with 
fire.” There’s a benefit screening 
at the Brava Theater, 2781 24th 
St., Dec. 9, 7pm. It’s $25 to get in, 
$50 ifyou wanttohitthe VIP recep¬ 
tion and meet the star, Richard 
Montoya, and the rest of the cast. 


HOLIER THAN THOU HANDS 

We love Hayes Valley’s Residents Apparel Gallery (541 
Octavia, SF. www.ragsf.com) becauseit’soneofthe 
only boutiques in the city in which it’s guaranteed that 
the fingerless gloves/crocheted dress/logo 
tee you fall in love with has been made right 
here in the Bay Area. Of course, it’s no sur¬ 
prise that the Beebalalou Jewelry nativity 
rings ($8 a piece) at RAG were made by 
Alameda resident Jen Bowan — these 
things could have only come from 
ourweird little neck of the Golden 
State. 


It’s always a trick to figure out What 
the Fuck Chuck Nevius is thinking, 
and his Nov. 27 blog was par¬ 
ticularly strange. “Every younger 
generation must have some trait, 
characteristic ortrend that totally 
alienates their elders,” he wrote, 
“Now, without any question, it is 
ink. Tattoos.” More: I think, I hope 
you like all that ink when you are 
50. Because I’ve seen those guys 
with the flames on their arms, or 
the barbed wire tat around their 
bicep, when they get older. And 
they don’t look hip or trendy then. 
They look old and wrinkled.” 

Chuck, Chuck, Chuck: The 
Tattoo thing started way long 
ago, at least 20 years before you 
noticed it. And the 50ish types we 
know all still love their tats. Maybe 
we’ll get some more — you know, to 
make those wrinkles look cool. 


POLITICAL ALERTS 








































EDITORIALS 


GUARDIAN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN I SFBG.COM 


An independent, locally owned 
and edited newspaper 


“IT IS A NEWSPAPER’S DUTY TO PRINT 
THE NEWS AND RAISE HELL.” 

Wilbur Storey, statement of the aims 
of the Chicago Times, 1861 


FOUNDERS AND CO-PUBLISHERS, 1966-2012 

BRUCEB. BRUGMANN ANDJEAN DIBBLE 

EDITOR AND PUBLISHERTIM REDMOND 

EDITORIAL 

MANAGING EDITOR MARKE B. 

CITY EDITOR STEVEN T. JONES 
SENIOR EDITOR, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT 

CHERYL EDDY 

CULTURE EDITOR CAITLIN DONOHUE 
MUSIC EDITOR EMILYSAVAGE 
CORRESPONDENTSHAWN GAYNOR 
COLUMNISTS JESSICA LANYADOO, L.E. LEONE 
EDITOR AT LARGE BRUCE B. BRUGMANN 
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS KIMBERLYCHUN, SUSAN 
GERHARD, JOHNNY RAY HUSTON, LYNN RAPOPORT, 
PAUL REIDINGER, J.H. TOMPKINS 
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS CHRIS ALBON, ROBERT 
AVILA, DAVID BACON, GARRETTCAPLES, MICHELLE 
DEVEREAUX, CAMPER ENGLISH, RITA FELCIANO, 
PETER GALVIN, NICOLE GLUCKSTERN, MAX 
GOLDBERG, GARY HANAUER, DENNIS HARVEY, 
JUSTIN JUUL, MARTIN A. LEE, ERICK LYLE, SEAN 
MCCOURT, D. SCOT MILLER, VIRGINIA MILLER, ERIK 
MORSE, PATRICK PORGANS, J.B. POWELL, MOSI 
REEVES, BEN RICHARDSON, AMBER SCHADEWALD, 
MARCYSHEINER, NORMAN SOLOMON, MATT 
SUSSMAN, JULIETTE TANG, MICHELLE TEA, 
ANDREWTOLVE, ANDRETORREZ 
INTERNS 

MOLLYCHAMPLIN, ERICCUADRA, 

JOE FITZGERALD, ALEX KEKAUOHA, 
GEORGE MCINTIRE, ANNA STERLING 

ART 

ART DIRECTOR BROOKE ROBERTSON 
CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS KEENEYANDLAW 
PHOTOGRAPHY, PATMAZZERA, RORY MCNAMARA, 
MATTHEW REAMER, CHARLES RUSSO, 
LUKETHOMAS, TOM TOMORROW 

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THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN (ISSN0036 4096) PUBLISHED 
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225 BUSH ST., 17TH FLOOR, SF, CA 94104. COPYRIGHT © 2012 BY 
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REPRODUCTION OR USE WITHOUT PERMISSION IS STRICTLY 
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BACK ISSUES: CHECK OUR SEARCH ENGINE FOR ARCHIVES OF 
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A*A*N ® 


NEWS i FOOD + DRINK 


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DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 / SFBG.COM 5 


Find our about our unique approach to 
higher education at one of our information 
sessions, and explore the programs that 
CMS has to offer. Faculty will provide insight 
into the programs’ mission and purpose, 
and cover relevant topics in their fields. 
Questions about admissions, curriculum, 
placement, financial aid, and scholarships 
will also be addressed. 


PROGRAM INFORMATION SESSIONS 

CHS Main Building 

1453 Mission Street (at 11th Street) 

San Francisco CA 94103 

TRANSFORMATIVE LEADERSHIP (MA) and 
TRANSFORMATIVE STUDIES (PHD) 

Thursday, December 6 
5 :oopm- 6 :oopm, room 425 

CREATIVE INQUIRY, 

INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTS 
and WRITING AND 
CONSCIOUSNESS (MFA) 

Thursday, December 6 
6 :oopm- 7 :oopm, room 560 

DRAMA THERAPY 

Sunday, December 9 
i:oopm- 3 :oopm, room 216 

SOMATIC PSYCHOLOGY 

Wednesday, December 12 
6 :oopm-8:oopm, room 216 

For more information, including transportation and 
parking options, visit our website at www.ciis.edu, 
or call 415 . 575 . 6154 . 

California Institute 
of Integral Studies 
www.dis.edu 


D 


n 


sells more bikes than any 
other S.F. Dealer... 
there must be a reason! 


glMIMMl 


D D 


Layaway Now! 

20% holds it ‘til 

. Christmas! ^ 


tHkEUWH vi Vhfinf 

1065 & 1077 Valencia (Btwn 21st & 22nd St.) • SF 
SALES 415-550-6600 • REPAIRS 415-550-6601 
MON-SAT 10-6, SUN 11-5 

valenciacyclery.com 














































EDITORIALS 


IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWSps 


FOOD AND DRINK pi4 


PICKS pie 


ARTS AND CULTURE pis 


MUSIC LISTINGS 30 / STAGE LISTINGS 34 
ON THE CHEAP 34 / FILM LISTINGS 35 


THIS WEEK AT 

SFBG.COM^ 

PSYCHIC DREAM ASTROLOGY, COMPLETE 
EVENTS, ALERTS, ART, AND MUSIC LIST¬ 
INGS, HOT LIST, COMMENTS, AND SO 
MUCH MORE! FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: 
WWW.TWITTER.COM/SFBG 

ON THE BLOGS 

POLITICS 


What’s wrong with the mayor’s 
sustainable energy task force report? 
A lot. 


A look at the city’s overhaul 
of ethics laws 

The New York Times on Twitter 
and corporate welfare 


NOISE 

Live Shots from Sufjan Stevens’ 
totally sold-out holiday show at 
Great American Music Hall and 
buzziest of buzz bands Death Grips, 
onstage at Slim’s 

Taylor Kaplan reviews the latest 
releases by Brian Eno and 
Scott Walker 

Marke B. interviews Tormenta Tropical 


PIXEL VISION 



Kitty porn: A whole bunch of photos 
from the SFPCA holiday pet windows 
at Macy’s 


George Mclntire chats with W. Kamau 
Bell about his new TV show, on the 
week the comedian plays the Fillmore 

Crab watch: The week in crab 


6 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 



--GY RgPURUCANS Wtt> t 
WANT TO tUT THE TAX CUTS 

FOft TH£ fOP W& £*flR£-- 


3 L 


by awew n renjHira of 
&QTH PAflTl£5 LOOKING tfOR AN 
oppotfTUNm to cur social SCCur- 
ITT Ah* rtEtotCAftE. 

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WHAT ARE f«l TALKING WH/T? 
EvtfffONE KNOWS THE two parties 
rtUST RAMMER WJT A GRAND 
BARGAIN BEFORE- THE of 
THE YEAR—dfi ELSE WE'LL 6o 
oVgR THg CUFFii 


by TOM TOMORROW 

THERE'S MO CLIFF. ME MON'f PLUNGE 
IMMEDIATELY INTO mE. ABYSS Ip IT 
TAKES A COUPLE EXTRA MEEKS TO 
RESOLVE THIS (Monti SELF-INFLIC¬ 
TED BUDGET MESS. 


IT'S JUST A SAD METAPHOR BE IMG 
used re CREATE A FALSE SENSE 
of VRGENCf- 




-WE'RE BEADED STRAmtCT 
FOR THE FISCAL CUFF!! 
WERE DOOMED, X TEU YOU- 
DOOOOQOMED' 


REMIND ME AGAIN 
WHY X AGREED TO 
LET YOU DRIVE? 



VOTE YES ON FRESH SCHOOL MEALS 


BY DANAWOLDOW 

OPINION My young friend ate 
school meals in San Francisco 
for 12 years. With food in short 
supply at home, he had little 
choice but to eat cafeteria offer¬ 
ings, but he was disheartened 
by the rubbery meat patties and 
limp vegetables that characterize 
frozen reheated school lunches. 
That's why he was thrilled to hear 
that SFUSD wants to replace fro¬ 
zen meals with freshly prepared 
entrees. Although his school 
lunch days are over, his younger 
siblings still rely on the cafeterias. 
He hopes they will never again be 
served a meal still frozen in the 
middle, or the lifeless, tasteless 
food he remembers. 

For years, parents and stu¬ 
dents have identified "fresh 
healthy food" as the most 
wanted improvement to school 
meals. SFUSD has tried to 
respond; middle and high 
schools offer lunch choices 
prepared daily on site, in addi¬ 


tion to the traditional frozen 
reheated entree. But now SFUSD 
is ready to move forward with 
a new meal contract that would 
ensure all meals at every school 
are freshly prepared locally. 

School officials are bring¬ 
ing the proposed contract, 
with Oakland-based Revolution 
Foods, to the Board of Education 
Dec. 11. With board approval, 
students will be enjoying freshly 
prepared meals as early as 
January 7th. 

Healthier food, happier stu¬ 
dents and parents — what's not 
to like? The price, of course. In 
expensive San Francisco, with 
above-average food and labor 
costs, the money the federal 
government provides for school 
meals for low income students 
is already insufficient to cover 
the cost of serving those meals. 
Replacing cheaper frozen entrees 
with freshly prepared offerings 
drives the price higher still, and 
despite the passage of Prop 30, 


SFUSD continues to face major 
financial challenges. 

The board should approve 
the new meal contract despite 
its higher cost — because aca¬ 
demic achievement, equity and 
proper nutrition are not unre¬ 
lated issues. Better food means 
better nourished students; 
healthy kids take fewer sick days 
and are better able to learn. 

Kids who eat only a few bites 
of unappealing meals return 
to class without the fuel they 
need to power them through 
an academic afternoon. Hungry 
students struggle to focus, or 
even to stay awake; they can 
be quick to anger (a condition 
school counselors call "hangry" 
— angry because hungry) and 
disrupt learning for everyone. 

SFUSD's student nutrition 
department runs the largest 
public feeding program in the 
city; the majority of school caf¬ 
eteria patrons are low-income 

CONTINUES ON PAGE 7 » 


THE REALITY 



RENEWABLE 

ENERGY 


BY TIM REDMOND 

tredmond@sfbg.com 

EDITOR’S NOTES The San 

Francisco Local Agency 
Formation Commission is 
holding a hearing Dec. 7 on 
the Mayor's Renewable Energy 
Task Force report. That may 
not sound like the most excit¬ 
ing moment in any of our lives 
— but it's actually worth talking 
about, a lot. Because the city has 
a goal of reaching 100 percent 
renewable energy in just eight 
more years, and the task force 
think it can be done — and the 
report, while it has its moments, 
completely screws up the central 
tenet of any long-term renew¬ 
ables policy. 

Background: Former Mayor 
Gavin Newsom, who was prone 
to making sweeping press 
statements about things he 
never really intended to do, 
proclaimed in 2010 that San 
Francisco would be free of all 
fossil fuel electricity in ten 
years. Then he went on his 
merry way to the Lieutenant 
Governor's Office. 

It fell to his successor, Ed 
Lee, to figure out how to make 
this happen, so Lee appointed 
a task force to study the situa¬ 
tion. A lot of the members were 
environmental activists; some 
were experts in solar energy. 
One, Ontario Smith, worked 
for Pacific Gas and Electric Co., 
hung up five minutes into the 
first phone-conference meeting, 
and took his name off the final 
report. 

If you don't think this is 
serious business, you haven't 
been looking out the window 
this past week. Scientists are 
now saying that it's already 
too late to prevent the surface 
temperature of the Earth from 
rising 3 degrees, which means 
volatile and dangerous weather 
patterns are going to be part of 
the future anyway, and things 
might get way, way worse. San 
CONTINUES ON PAGE 7 » 



| EDITORIALS 

NEWS 

1 FOOD + DRINK 

| PICKS 

| ARTS + CULTURE 

I MUSIC LISTINGS 

STAGE LISTINGS 

| ON THE CHEAP 

FILM LISTINGS 

| CLASSIFIEDS 

































































































































EDITORIALS 


GUARDIAN PHOTO 
BY MIRISSA NEFF 



THE REALITY OF RENEWABLE ENERGY 

CONT» 


Francisco's energy policy isn't 
going to prevent China from 
burning coal, but it's a step 
— and a 100 percent renewable 
portfolio would be a signal to 
other cities (and countries) that 
this is economically and techni¬ 
cally feasible. 

The report has 39 recom¬ 
mendations, many of them 
simple, practical, and laud¬ 
able. It talks (correctly) about 
the importance of distributed 
generation — that is, small- 
scale solar and other renewable 
systems on houses and com¬ 
mercial buildings. It gives a 
nod to CleanPowerSF, the city's 
community-choice aggregation 
system. 

And it never once mentions 
public power. 

In fact, from the tone of the 
report, the city plans to get to 
100 percent renewable genera¬ 
tion with the support and assis¬ 
tance of PG&E. 

Let me give you a ring on 
the clue phone, folks: It isn't 
going to happen. 

Private utilities don't have 
any interest in distributed 
generation, because it, quite 
literally, destroys their business 


model. If I have solar panels on 
my roof that meet my family's 
energy demands, I have no need 
for PG&E anymore (except to 
use the company's grid as a stor¬ 
age battery system, but soon we 
won't need that, either). The 
only functional path to 100 
percent renewables in a dense 
city is small-scale generation 
— and PG&E stands directly in 
the way. 

I've always been a proponent 
of public ownership of essen¬ 
tial services — water, power, 
streets and roads, firefighting 
and police operations, broad¬ 
band, etc. But when it comes to 
electricity, this is more than a 
financial and resource-control 
issue. I see no path to a carbon- 
free (and nuclear-free) future, in 
San Francisco or anywhere else, 
as long as private companies 
make profits generating power 
in one place, shipping it along 
their private lines, and selling it 
someplace else. 

Public power is not suf¬ 
ficient to create Newsom's 
energy dream — but it's abso¬ 
lutely necessary. And I hope 
the members of LAFCO make 
that point — and suggest that 
the task force update its report 
to reflect economic and politi¬ 
cal reality, sfbg 


VOTE YES ON FRESH SCHOOL MEALS 

C0NT» 


children of color, so offering 
better food is an equity issue. 

If the board nixes the new 
contract, meal costs will still 
increase in 2013, with food, 
milk and delivery prices already 
rising. So SFUSD would find 
itself paying more for the same 
frozen meals students reject 


now. 

The SF Board of Education 
meets at 6pm, in the Irving G. 
Breyer Board Meeting Room on 
the ground floor at 555 Franklin 
Street, sfbg 

Dana Woldow is the parent of 
three SFUSD graduates, and has 
been an advocate for better school 
food since 2002. 



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DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 / SFBG.COM 7 























































The San Francisco school 


SF SUFFERS IF 1,900 KIDS DON'T GRADUATE. 


FOR MORE NEWS CONTENT VISIT 

SFBG.COM/POLITICS K 


> SFUSD NEEDS 
$2.7 MILLION. 
JUST DO IT. 


H^ffKENtU 

11 . 28 - 12 . 4.2 


© IN MEMORY 
OF SPAIN 


By the time I arrived in San 
Francisco, in 1982, Spain Rodriguez 
was already a legend — a protege of 
R. Crumb, one of the founders of 
the underground comix movement, 
the illustrator who did the posters 
for the Mime Troupe ... all of us 
young hippies, punks, artists, and 
writers lived in awe. 

When I first heard he might do 
a cover for the Guardian, I thought: 
Wow. We've made it. 

He came 
into the 
office with 
a sketch, 
and I met a 
really mellow 
man, with no 
apparent ego 
or sense of 
fame. I made 
some sugges¬ 
tions (timidly — how does a young 
editor suggest that an artistic icon 
change his work?) and Spain nod¬ 
ded, thanked me for my input and 
did everything I asked. 

Over the years, he did probably 
a dozen Guardian covers, every one 
a gem — and in every case, he was a 
pleasure to work with. With all due 
respect to my friends in the creative 
world, that's 
not always 
the case 
cover artists; 

I actually had ,*■ ■ 

one person tell 

me once that I I 

wasn't paying 

her enough 

to have her 

listen to my 

suggestions. 

But Spain was 

just a wonderful, decent guy who 
happened to be one of the most tal¬ 
ented artists of his generation. 

He died Nov. 28, after a battle 
with cancer, at his home in Bernal 


Heights. He was 72. 

Spain — and that's how he 
was known to all of us, and how 
he signed his work — was born 
in Buffalo, New York, went to art 
school in Connecticut but quickly 
dropped out and hit the New York 
underground art scene, with Art 
Spiegelman and Crumb. He was 
one of the early creative forces in 
the legendary Zap Comix, which 
reflected his radical left leanings, 


the (graphic) sexual revolution, and 
his love for poster art. 

By the 1970s, he was in San 
Francisco, working with Ron 
Turner at Last Gasp, which pub¬ 
lished most of the era's most 
important underground comics. 
We ran one of his 1980s comic 
strips, "Factwino V. Armageddon 
Man," which also became a Mime 
Troupe play. 

When I went to see his wife, 


Susan Stern, to get some pieces 
of art to run with this story, she 
showed me the amazing unfin¬ 
ished mural he was doing on the 
wall of his studio. "He worked on 
it every day," she said. "It was as if 
he had to draw or die." 

We will miss him. San 
Francisco will miss him. There 
will be a memorial in the spring, 
and I'll keep you posted. — Tim 
Redmond 


district's achievement gap 
exploded into the news when 
district officials learned that 
as many as 1,900 high school 
juniors — the vast majority 
of them students of color 
— aren't on track to meet the 
new graduation standards. 

It's a crisis: The district 
several years ago mandated 
that every high school gradu¬ 
ate complete the A to G class¬ 
es required by the California 
State University system — 
essentially a requirement that 
every graduate be prepared 
for college. It was going to be 
a tough standard to meet — 
and that was before the state 
whacked $77 million out of 
the SFUSD budget. 

To make things worse, 
the district's funding for 
after-school classes to help 
students who are behind 
catch up — known as "credit 
recovery" — is ending in 
December. 

So Sup. Jane Kim is ask¬ 
ing the city to pick up the 
$2.7 million tab for the credit 
recovery program, which 
makes perfect sense: If 1,900 
kids don't graduate from 
high school, the impacts on 
the city, from crime, unem¬ 
ployment, and social-service 
needs to homelessness, will 
vastly exceed that number. 

The problem: The mayor's 
office wants to take some of 
the money from the Rainy 
Day Fund, a pool of cash that 
the city gives the schools, 
mostly to prevent teacher 
layoffs. "We're in support of 
the $2.7 million allocation," 
teacher's union staffer Ken 
Tray told me. "We can't fail 
these kids. But we're afraid 
that the money that would 
go for this very good thing 
would lead to teacher layoffs." 

So Sup. David Campos 
and others are asking a sim¬ 
ple question: Since the city's 
budget is getting better, and 
it's a tiny amount of money, 
why not just give it to the 
schools without any games or 
strings? — Tim Redmond 


SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 


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H MB 


Jasper Johns: Seeing with the Mind’s Eye is organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. 

PRESENTING SPONSORS 

MIMI AND PETER HAAS FUND 


PREMIER CORPORATE SPONSOR 

Bankof America ^ 


ALSO ON VIEW AT SFMOMA: 


Learn more at sfmoma.org 


Major support is provided by Martha and Bruce Atwater and The James C. Hormel and Michael P. Nguyen Endowment Fund. The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. 

Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective is organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Major support for this exhibition is provided by the National Committee of the Whitney Museum of American Art and The Andy Warhol 
Foundation for the Visual Arts. Generous support is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. 


The San Francisco presentation is made possible by leadership support from the Phyllis C. Wattis Fund for Traveling Exhibitions. 


Left and center: Jasper Johns, Highway, 1959; Private collection. 0 through 9, 1960; Collection of the artist. Both © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Top right: Jay DeFeo, After Image (detail), 1970; The Menil 
Collection, Houston; gift of Glenn Fukushima; © 2012 The Jay DeFeo Trust/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; photo: Paul Hester. Bottom right: Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Frequency and Volume, Relational Architecture 9 
(2003); installation view at La GaTte Lyrique, Paris, France, 2011; photo: Antimodular Research, courtesy Galena OMR and bitforms gallery. 


Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective 


Rafael Lozano-Hemmer 
Frequency and Volume 


EDITORIALS 


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DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 / SFBG.COM 9 























































NEWS 


The city’s eviction 
of HANC’s recycling 
center could harm local 
businesses along with the 
gardeners and recyclers 

BY JOE FITZGERALD 

news@sfbg.com 

NEWS So much for the holiday 
spirit. 

In a win for the NIMBY neigh¬ 
bors of the Haight neighborhood, 
the Haight Ashbury Recycling 
Center was gifted with its final 
eviction notice, ordering it out on 
the street by the day this story goes 
to print, Dec. 5. 

But those who hoped this evic¬ 
tion would rid the neighborhood of 
poor people recycling bottles and 
cans may be disappointed — and 
so might local small businesses that 
could face some unintended conse¬ 
quences of the move. 

The site, run by the Haight 
Ashbury Neighborhood Council 
(HANC), houses a community gar¬ 
den, native plant nursery, and recy¬ 
cling center. HANC battled eviction 
for nearly a decade as newer neigh¬ 
borhood associations complained 
to the city, saying the center was 
too noisy and attracted too many 
homeless people. 

The recycling center is located 
at the edge of Golden Gate Park 
behind Kezar stadium, and has 
been crushing cans and busting 
bottles since 1974. 

The San Francisco Recreation 
and Park Department issued several 
eviction notices to HANC over the 
years, and the process seemed to 
drag on, but the eviction notice 
from the Sheriff's Department on 
Nov. 28 is likely the last nail in the 
coffin. 

"We've exhausted our legal 
options," Ed Dunn, HANC's direc¬ 
tor, told us. 

Even Sup. Christina Olague, 
who has championed HANC as 
one of their few supporters on the 
current Board of Supervisors, said 
that the recycling center was done, 
although representatives from Sup. 
Eric Mar's office told us they were 
still hopeful the eviction could be 
delayed long enough to relocate 
HANC somewhere else. 

Olague told us that she'd talked 
to Mayor Ed Lee about the issue 
many times, and they discussed 
many options. But with the finality 
of the eviction notice, she said, "I 
just don't know what we can do." 

10 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 


PEOPLE WHO MAKE THEIR LIVING COLLECTING BOTTLES AND CANS WON’T BE THE ONLY ONES AFFECTED BY THE I FOR MORE NEWS CONTENT VISIT 

EVICTION OF THE HAIGHT ASHBURY RECYCLING CENTER. GETTY IMAGES PHOTO BY MARIO TAMA | SFBG.COM/POLITICS 



COAL FOR CHRISTMAS 

The recycling center's employees 
will lose their jobs just at the start 
of the winter holiday season. "The 
notion that they'd put people out of 
work before Christmas was horren¬ 
dous," Dunn said. 

What will happen to HANC's 10 
employees is up in the air. "I have 
no idea what I'll do," HANC employ¬ 
ee Brian McMahon told us, lowering 
his orange protective headphones to 
talk. He's worked there since 1989, 
and his last job was at a Goodwill 
store. "The quote under my high 
school yearbook picture says Take 
it as it comes,' and that's what I'm 
going to do." 

Susan Fahey, the sheriff's media 
relations officer, declined to discuss 
the details of how the officers would 
handle the eviction, saying only 
that "we plan accordingly." 

A staff report prepared for the 
Recreation and Park Commission's 
Nov. 20 meeting estimated that just 
0.1 percent of San Francisco's recy¬ 
cling tonnage is processed at HANC, 
according to a report by citizen jour¬ 
nalist Adrian Rodriguez. The agenda 
also said that the Department of 
Environment was confident that 
recyclers would use other nearby 
sites instead. 

But the customers at HANC that 
we talked to didn't agree. 

"I think it's necessary they have 
the [recycling center] here," HANC 
customer Eugene Wong told us. 
Wong lives in the Haight, and hauls 
in his recyclables every six months 
or so for some extra pocket money. 
As Wong and his friend Bob Boston 
spoke, one of their Haight Ashbury 
neighbors, Rory O'Connor, surprised 
them as he walked up. 


"Just droppin' off my beer 
cans, man," O'Connor said. Asked 
if he would make his way out to 
the Bayview recycling center when 
HANC closed, he said, "You'll spend 
more on gas than you would even 
get back." 

There were quite a few neighbor¬ 
hood locals there that day, and more 
people drove into the recycling 
center than there were people push¬ 
ing shopping carts. But it's the folks 
with the shopping carts that had 
HANC's opponents up in arms. 

And though some — like 
Chronicle columnist C.W. Nevius, 
a regular critic of HANC — are cel¬ 
ebrating HANC's demise, the unin¬ 
tended consequences should have 
all small businesses in the Haight 
Ashbury worried. 

CLASS WARFARE BACKFIRES 

State law requires that Californians 
have easy access to a "convenience 
zone," basically somewhere nearby 
that they can collect the five-cent 
deposit all consumers pay for cans 
and bottles. HANC served that pur¬ 
pose for a half mile radius around its 
location on Frederick, near Stanyan. 

"Whole Foods and Andronico's 
were serviced by HANC's existence," 
Regina Dick-Endrizzi, the director 
of San Francisco's Office of Small 
Business, told us. With HANC gone, 
"They will be required to buy back 
[bottles and cans] from local stores." 

San Francisco's Department of 
Environment oversees recycling pol¬ 
icy in the city, but did not respond 
to calls or emails. 

The reason that HANC was 
being pushed out was due to a 
vocal few, like the Haight Ashbury 
Improvement Association, com¬ 
plaining that HANC was a magnet 


to the homeless population looking 
to sell bottles and cans collected in 
shopping carts. That group didn't 
respond by press time. Now those 
same poor folks may take their busi¬ 
ness from Golden Gate Park to the 
Haight neighborhood itself by recy¬ 
cling at the local Whole Foods, the 
new legal alternative to HANC. 

Sometimes local grocery stores 
defy the state mandate, and instead 
choose to pay a state-mandated fee, 
Dick-Endrizzi said. If Whole Foods 
chooses not buy back recyclables, 
small businesses all over the Haight 
will be required by state law to do it 
themselves. 

Suhail Sabba has owned 
Parkview Liquors on Stanyan Street, 
just two blocks from HANC, for 
nine years. He said that he doesn't 
have the employees, storage, or 
scale "to handle even a portion of 
HANC's customers." 

He may not have much of a 
choice. If small businesses don't buy 
back the recyclables, they would 
face charges of $100 a day under 
California state law. A year gone 
without complying would lead to 
charges up to $36,000, an amount 
that large-scale businesses often 
factor into their budgets, but which 
could bankrupt a small store. 

When contacted, Whole Foods 
representative Adam Smith said that 
the company was aware of the issue 
and was still deciding on a course of 
action. 

The company has a 60-day grace 
period to make a decision that, for 
good or ill, would ripple through the 
Haight neighborhood. "I might go 
out of business," Sabba said. 

Store owners can apply for an 
exemption, but the process can be as 


lengthy as a few months and fines 
could still accrue, Dick-Endrizzi said. 
The Office of Small Business will soon 
reach out to the affected store owners, 
but she encourages them to contact 
her office directly at 415-554-6134. 

GARDEN FOR A GARDEN 

The HANC site houses more than 
the recycling center. It also encom¬ 
passes a native plant nursery, run for 
the past decade by caretaker Greg 
Gaar, who we've profiled before 
("Reduce, reuse, replace," 5/30/12). 
Gaar raises Dune Tansy, Beach 
Sagewort, Coast Buckwheat and 
Bush Monkey — all native plants 
bred from the dunes of old San 
Francisco, which Golden Gate Park 
used to be. 

Adjacent to the nursery is a com¬ 
munity garden with 50 plots serv¬ 
ing just more than 100 neighbors. 
But the odd part is, when the city 
is done tearing down the recycling 
center and gardens, it plans to put 
in, well, another community gar¬ 
den, at taxpayer expense. 

The new plan does offer a few 
tweaks. There will be a small stone 
Greek-style amphitheater, and 
removing the recycling center will 
leave more green space for the site. 
The new community garden will 
feature 10 fewer plots. As of now, 
there is no formal plan to transfer 
the 100 gardeners from HANC's 
community gardens to the new 
plots once they've been built. 

Some of HANC's current garden¬ 
ers count among the local homeless 
population, said Soumyaa Behrens, 
HANC's social media coordinator. 
Those few homeless use their plots 
to grow food. 

"You meet people you wouldn't 
meet anywhere else," said Miriam 
Pinchuck, a writer who will soon 
lose her and her husband's garden 
plot at HANC. "It's very shortsight¬ 
ed, and it'd deprive us of a chance to 
meet our neighbors." 

Though Dunn and Gaar are in 
negotiations with city officials on 
their gardners' behalf, at this point 
it looks like the current gardeners 
will need to sign up for the new 
plots, just like everybody else. 

Gaar looks like he may be the 
only employee to work at the new 
garden site once it replaces the recy¬ 
cling center. He'd have to volunteer, 
but he said that doesn't necessarily 
bother him. 

"For me, gardening is a joy," 

Gaar said, although he did voice one 
concern: "I just want the nursery to 
survive." 

With HANC's eviction, it seems 
like everyone has something to 
worry about, sfbg 


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Afrolicious presents: Wil Dog from Ozomatli at the Elbo Room 

If your planning on checking out the Grammy award-winning group Ozomatli this weekend at the Fillmore, 
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he has been singing lead vocals under the name El Gavachillo with a Mexican banda. Wil - a Jewish boy 
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soften the blow. Their sound is true to the genre, with an added rock and roll swagger. DJ Senor Oz shares the 
bill, along with Regimen Sinaloense Caipo from Bang Data and the resident Afrolicious percussionists. 
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THE LATIN DISH: POLITICS CON SALSA 


GETTY IMAGES PHOTO 
BY JOHN MOORE 


IMMIGRANTS — OR REFUGEES? 


Words matter, and we’re using the wrong one 


BY ALEJANDRO MURGUIA 

NEWS Whenever politicians start talking immigration 
reform it always reminds me of the story—perhaps 
chisme —about that guy, who, you know, burned 
his neighbor's house down, and then when the 
neighbors jumped over the fence to escape the fire, 
he complained bitterly, just bitterly, that they were 
trampling his rose garden. 

It's the same with the pejoratives "illegal alien," 
or in a kinder mood "undocumented worker." Both of 
these terms, like the phrase "immigration reform," are 
tricks with words to hide the true status of this unique 
community. 

Just think about the language for a minute. These 12 
million human beings, this mass of humanity that has 
flooded over the southern border of the US, are neither 
illegal nor undocumented. The precise and accurate 
English word is refugees. 

Why are they refugees? For the most part, the great 
majority of them are fleeing some sort of political, eco¬ 
nomic or military chaos—the metaphoric burning house. 

You want to know who is burning down the house? 

US foreign policy is like a match setting fire every¬ 
where, a sort of scorched Earth in regards to Latin America. 

Just so we don't recount a whole catalogue of arson 
that is the story of US-Latin America relations in the 
last century, here's a current example, that of Honduras, 
somewhere in Central America. 

Even a democrat like President Obama couldn't 
resist kicking out the elected president, Manuel Zelaya, 
in the middle of the night, as if he was a banana worker. 
I'm talking about the president of the country known 
as Honduras. The president. Sent out of the country in 
his pajamas in the middle of the night before the aston¬ 
ished eyes of Latin Americans, a noble action in support 
of a decrepit oligarchy that has impoverished the coun¬ 
try for more than a hundred years as if in a magical-real- 
ism novel. And this coup d' etat, this destabilization of 
the country, ushered in a whole new level of chaos with 
total impunity for the oligarchy and the military. 

In the aftermath of that tragic June day, hundreds of 
people would be killed or disappeared. Journalists were 
assassinated at will. A country so on fire it now holds 
the sad distinction as the most violent place on earth, 
more violent deaths per capita than Iraq, Afghanistan, 
West Oakland or La Mision. Cartels up the yin-yang 
— even the US Peace Corps pulled out, couldn't handle 
the heat. Are we clear about this? 

Now remind me — how many refugees were created 
by this chaos, by this sickening rerun of the banana- 
republic-soap-opera bullshit of the 20 th century? 

Then after his quick knock out in Honduras, 
President Obama showed his true hand by deporting 
400,000 refugees a year in the greatest forced migration 
in human history. Many of these deportees were sent 
back to — Honduras, the house he just set on fire. 

So you see — it's a two-faced game, with a perfect 
cycle of opportunism. 

Here's part of the hypocrisy with this phony immigra¬ 
tion reform debate. For the politicos — they only pontifi¬ 
cate about their own little border. But this chaos doesn't 
just destabilize the sacred border of the US, but also the 
southern border of Mexico, of Guatemala, of Belize, you 
know, the domino effect, something that politicos don't 
talk about because they have no knowledge of geography. 



A RECENTLY-DEPORTED MEXICAN IMMIGRANT 
SHOWS OFF HIS JACKET OUTSIDE AN AID STATION IN 
MEXICO, JUST ACROSS THE BORDER FROM ARIZONA 


IMMIGRATION REFORM HOT DOG 

Seared with billions in military aid 
Trussed together with phony borders, barbed wire, 
Ridiculous fences and patriotic scoundrels 
Wrapped in red-white-blue cheesecloth 
Slathered with the thickest of lies 
Cooked to perfection on Fox-no-news 

Serve flambeed at the next 
Immigration reform potluck 
Invite your neighbor 

Now why not use the word refugees? And since the 
US has just been re-elected to another three-year term on 
the Human Rights Council of the United Nations, shall 
we stop the name calling and get serious about the issue? 

But wait — if they are named refugees then it would 
change their status, actually accord them rights and 
protection — just like any refugee in Africa, Asia or the 
Middle East. A whole series of UN protocols would come 
into effect. It would force this country to look hard and 
deep into its bloody history with the rest of the conti¬ 
nent. What politico wants that? And what politico wants 
to lose million of workers who can be exploited perhaps 
for generations as long they are kept in the shadows? 

So the next time you see someone who might be a 
refugee — especially a Latino, since Latinos seem to be 
the main focus of Immigration Control and Enforcement 
— ask yourself what country that person might be from. 
Ask yourself if the US created some chaos there — and 
if you don't know, try reading some critical histories of 
the continent. Guatemala Country Occupied by Eduardo 
Galeano, Or Empire's Workshop by Greg Grandin. or 
Masters of War, by Clara Nieto or, well — you get my drift. 

As long as the US doesn't stop creating chaos, prop¬ 
ping up mummies and dropping matches all over the 
neighborhood, you won't be able to build a fence high 
enough or long enough to stop the flood of refugees 
from escaping the fire. Regardless what you do with the 
"reform" you'll soon have millions more refugees. 

As for the guy who complained about the neighbors 
trampling his rose garden—well, why did you burn your 
neighbor's casita down for pendejo ? sfbg 


12 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 


EDITORIALS 


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NEWS 


FOR MORE NEWS CONTENT VISIT 

SFBG.COM/POLITICS 


GUNS IN BAYVIEW 


.Local activists differ on SF gun control ordinances 

.that are now underfire by the NRA. 

BY JOE FITZGERALD 


news@sfbg.com 

NEWS The National Rifle 
Association's bid to kill two San 
Francisco gun control ordinances 
— which a federal judge initially 
rejected last week, although that 
legal process continues — highlights 
differing views on the issue in the 
violence-plagued Bayview, where 
two prominent activists have 
opposing viewpoints. 

One ordinance requires guns 
in the home to be locked up 
when not on the owner's person 
and the second bans the sale 
of fragmenting and expanding 
bullets, affecting only the 
city's sole gun store: High 
Bridge Arms, in the Mission 
district. 

The first 
ordinance was 
introduced 
in 2007 by 
then-Mayor 
Gavin Newsom 
and supported by Sheriff and 
then-Sup. Ross Mirkarimi and 
opposed by three supervisors: Ed 
Jew, Aaron Peskin, and Chris Daly. 
City Attorney Dennis Herrera was 
pleased at the judge's ruling. 

"The NRA took aim at San 
Francisco's Police Code," Herrera 
said in a press release. "I'm proud of 
the efforts we've made to beat back 
these legal challenges, and preserve 
local laws that can save lives." 

NRA attorney C.D. Michel told 
the San Francisco Examiner, "This 
is not over, not by a long shot... 
What if you're old and need glasses 
in the middle of the night, or you 
have kids at home to protect? Why 
are they being forced to keep their 
guns locked up?" 

Interestingly, its not the NRA's 
name on the front of the lawsuit, 
entitled "Espanola Jackson v. City 
and County of San Francisco." 

Jackson, a San Francisco native 
and longtime Bayview Hunter's 
Point civil rights activist, has been 
fighting for the rights of minorities 
since she was old enough to hold a 
picket sign. She was recognized last 
May by the San Francisco Human 
Rights Commission with a "Legacy 
Award for a Lifetime in Human 
Rights Advocacy." 

So why is she advocating for 


unlocked guns in the home, and 
more lethal bullets? 

"I live in the Bayview and I'm 79 
years old," she told The Guardian. 
"We're mostly single women, but we 
need to have protection." 

She cited a recent police report 
she'd read of an elderly woman 
being assaulted by several teenage 
girls, just blocks from her home, as 
one of the many reasons she 
feels she needs protection in 
her own neighborhood. 

Jackson said she's had 
a lifetime of training with 
her firearm, although she 
wouldn't identify the kind 
of weapon she wields. Back 
in the '60s, she said, "they 
were calling us pistol packing 
mamas." It's that history, she 
said, that makes her feel saf¬ 
est with a gun in her drawer, 
where she can easily get it in 
case of a robbery. 

But Theo Ellington 
— a board member of the 
Bayview Opera House and the 
Southeast Community Facilities 
Commission — sees the issue dif¬ 
ferently. Notably, as a member of 
the Young Black Democrats, he 
led the opposition against Mayor 
Ed Lee's proposal to introduce 
"Stop and Frisk" policing to San 
Francisco. Lee abandoned the idea 
after activists cited rampant civil 
rights abuses under the policy in 
New York City. 

Ellington thinks that overturn¬ 
ing the San Francisco's gun ordi¬ 
nances would be a bad idea. "We 
face a much greater risk if we fail to 
take measures to prevent [gun] acci¬ 
dents," Ellington told us. "The last 
thing we want is for any weapons 
to be in the hands of children or for 
potential misuse." 

He has reason to be worried 
about the Bayview. Recent city 
statistics show an upswing in most 
crime categories in the district from 
2011 to 2012, from homicides and 
rape to vehicle theft and burglaries. 
National studies have shown gun 
owners or their family members are 
more likely to get shot by guns kept 
in homes than are intruders. 

Public safety means different 
things in different areas, Ellington 
said, especially "when we're dealing 
with a population that is plagued by 
gun violence." sfbg 





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CENTRAL MARKET 


sfbg.com/ 

central-market 


Art, Shows! Shopping + Dining That’s Uniquely San Francisco 


Pearl’s Deluxe Burgers 

I One cannot call him or herself a burger fan unless they’ve eaten at Pearl’s. 

* With four locations, two of which are in San Francisco, there’s no excuse 
not to! They’ve got a variety of beef burgers (including Kobe!) and chicken 
sandwiches, salads, homemade chili, and plenty of sides to make everyone 
in your party happy. Try the healthier and leaner grass-fed buffalo burger, or 
the somewhat less so King Burger topped with a hot dog, or the much less 
so - and appropriately named - Phat Bob with BBQ sauce, bacon, onion 
rings, and cheese. Pearl’s looks out for the vegetarians with veggie burger 
options, as well as the more indecisive crowd with their clever sides menu 
that includes “springs” (half sweet potato fries and onion rings), “spries” 

* (half sweet potato fries and french fries), and “frings” (you guessed it 
- half french fries and onion rings). Down any combo 





CounterPULSE 

A Catalyst for Art & Action 

1310 Mission Street 

San Francisco, CA 
415.626.2060 
CounterPULSE.org 


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415-484-6575 

Weekdays llam-7pm 
Weekends 12-5pm 

Free Repair Kiosk: Market at 7th St. 
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San Francisco Campus 
1035 Market Street 

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info@kunst-stoff.org 
www.KUNST-STOFF.org 




FOOD + DRINK 


COMPANY'S SQUASH SOUP WITH DUCK CONFIT; TATER TOTS 

AND A PB & JAM AT JAMBER. GUARDIAN PHOTOS BY VIRGINIA MILLER 


COMFORT, AU COURANT 


BY VIRGINIA MILLER 

virginia@bayguardian.com 

APPETITE San Francisco doesn't lack for comfort food. 
The last decade's wave of twists on hearty, familiar fare 
has insured most neighborhoods aren't without elevated 
burgers and grown-up childhood favorites. Two new 
restaurants, opened in September, continue and update 
the trend. 



COMPANY 

Guerrero and 22nd Street has long been one of my 
favorite corners. Whether enjoying a pint at the 
Liberties, a cocktail at retro fabulous bar Lone Palm, or 
house charcuterie at Beast and the Hare, at this intersec¬ 
tion I feel transported, encouraged to linger and take in 
my surroundings, as if in Europe. In Company's big pic¬ 
ture windows, vintage red chairs and retro lamps make 
the space even more welcoming than it was before, as 
Tao Cafe. Lunch is idyllic: a book, a sandwich, and a 
bowl of soup becomes a way of spoiling myself. 

Dinner is likewise mellow, families and couples 
confirming a local vibe. It's clear in early months that 
while Company may not be revolutionary destination 
dining, chef-owners Karen Hoffman (from Four Seasons 
Newport Beach and Jardiniere) and Jason Poindexter 
(Four Seasons Chicago and San Francisco) offer tranquil 
surroundings and well-executed food. The ubiquitous 
upscale burger is there: "Breadand Butter" burger ($14), a 
patty of ground chuck and oxtail, topped with Madeira- 
glazed pioppini mushrooms and decadent triple creme 
brie. At lunch, vegetarian stands up to burger and pork 
offerings: grilled eggplant and house ricotta panini ($11) 
is layered with rapini/broccoli rabe and romesco sauce. 
Smoky eggplant and ricotta are in harmony: warm, luxu¬ 
rious, almost healthy. A bowl of squash soup, savory with 
duck confit, brightened by citrus reduction, is $8 but as 
an add-on cup to a lunch entree is merely $3. 

At dinner, salads are vivid, unlisted vegetables one 
night in a "crisp vegetable salad" ($9) being beets, 
cucumber, and avocado over sweet gem lettuce, tossed 
with feta and toasted pine nuts in a basil mint vinai¬ 
grette. House-cured salmon salad ($11) is likewise fresh 
and silky, with cucumber and beets in yogurt dill dress¬ 
ing. Crispy confit chicken wings ($9) are especially ten¬ 
der, accented with heat (and color) from red jalapenos 
and fried mint leaves. Syrah-braised short ribs ($23) are 
cooked in harissa, evoking Middle Eastern intrigue over 
whipped garnet yams and charred rapini. 

With four beers on draft, like intense peach notes 
of Widmer Bros. BRRR Seasonal Red Ale from Portland 
($6), and a shorter wine list (heavy on France, Italy, 
California), there are cocktails sans hard liquor from 


Assistant General Manager Russell Morton. While I 
don't get excited about soju and wine cocktails, prefer¬ 
ring robust spirits to mild soju, Morton elevates an 
amaretto sour into an almond cherry sour ($6), keeping 
house amaretto tart rather than too sweet, with lemon, 
cherry bitters, and brandied cherries. 

1000 Guerrero, SF. (415) 374-7479, www.companysf.com 



JAMBER 

Midwestern brother-sister duo Jess and Matt Voss 
opened Jamber, serving gourmet pub food from Chef 
Peter Baker with California-only wines and beers, all on 
tap. The siblings' care shows in hand-assembled tables, 
chairs made from wine barrels, wines selected from 
wineries they personally visited, a hip, industrial vibe 
warmed by woods and graffiti art in the loft-like space 
with a walled front patio. 

Wines (happily, there are options: 2.5 oz. and 5 oz. 
glasses, 1/2 or full jugs), like Darcie Kent Gruner Veltliner 
from Monterey or a Margerum Grenache Blanc from 
Santa Barbara, flow easily from taps, with beers such as 
Almanac's Farmhouse Ale or a hibiscus saison, Pacific 
Brewing Lab's Nautulis. In my visits, there's a relaxed 
welcome from staff best experienced sitting at the rustic 
wood bar. Jess' bacon jam recipe is a highlight: a savory, 
textured pleasure of a spread, no matter what it's served 
with. Mr. Meatloaf ($15) is the star, a hefty, tender slab 
of buffalo meatloaf wrapped in bacon, accompanied 
by mashed potatoes and roasted carrots. I often find 
myself bored by big hunks of ground meat. Not so here. 
Jamber's meatloaf is about as good as meatloaf gets. 

Two more standouts: PB & Jam ($11) is a hunk of 
pork belly layered in a sandwich with peanut butter 
and that Jamber bacon jam. Most starters, like pretzels 
and fried mozzarella, are on the heavy side; the top one 
is easily Parmesan rosemary mashed potater tots ($8) 

— warm mashed potatoes oozing out of lightly fried 
breading — with, yes, Jamber bacon jam. After a decent 
mac 'n cheese ($10) or freshly generous salads ($7-$9), a 
pot pie ($12-$14), namely ratatouille, sounded brilliant 
but was a soggy, funky mash of vegetables in flavorless 
crust. Likewise, the beet Jamburger ($10, there is a veal- 
beef burger for $12) made me sorry I took the vegetarian 
path. Despite fresh bread, it tasted like slices of beet on a 
bun rather than the creative beet-veggie patties I've had 
that never replace a "real" burger but can be a worthy 
sandwich on their own. 

Despite a couple difficult dishes, there's enough here to 
love at this all-day SoMa spot for a drink and a filling bite. 
858 Folsom, SF. (415) 273-9192, www.jambersf.com sfbg 

Subscribe to Virgina's twice-monthly newsletter ; 

The Perfect Spot , www.theperfectspotsf.com 


14 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 


EDITORIALS I NEWS 


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FOOD + DRINK: CHEAP EATS ® Q q 6 

BOY HOWDY 


BY L.E. LEONE 

le.chicken.farmer@gmail.com 

CHEAP EATS This. 

CHEAP SPORTS 

BY HEDGEHOG 

I love my editor/column hostess. 

And not just because Tm domesti¬ 
cally partnered to her (though that 
helps). 

My loyalty running as deep 
as it does in her general direction, 
when I see her overworked, I want 
to unburden her. Tonight, she made 
pork chops. They were delicious: 
on a bed of leftover basmati rice 
from an unfortunate delivery job 
earlier in the week, with a side of 
sauteed string beans. Best dinner of 
the day, hands down. And then she 
says to me, she says "Confound it, 
Hedgehog. My column's due again." 

"Has it been a week already? 
Well don't fret," says I (we always 
speak like old-timey prospectors 
after dinner), "it's still early. You can 
write your column aftern you do the 
dishes." 

"No," she says. "By the time I 
finish doing all of these here dishes 
— dishes which, mind you, were 
dirtied in service of a meal you spe¬ 
cifically requestered — I'll be too 
tired to type let alone think of some 
other meal I ate somewheres else 
and review it." 

So here I am, writing her review 
for her while she does the dishes. 
And to make sure my editor's edi¬ 
tors know I mean business, I'll give 
you not one but two reviews for the 
price of none this week. 

First there was this Vietnamese 
place we went to called Oriental 
Something or Other. That's not 
really the name but I'm not really 
a food reviewer so I forgot to grab 
a menu and I can't rightly bother 
the actual food reviewer while she's 
elbows-deep in lemon-scented bub¬ 
bles. Anyway, it was in Berkeley. You 
can find it on Yelp, I'm sure. 

And when youse're done reading 
everyone else's uneducated opinion 
there, here's one more: it was really 
good pho. And a really disappoint¬ 
ing shrimp spring roll. Mostly rice 
noodles, one little shrimp splayed 
open like that dude Hannibal Lector 
hung from the rafters (not Pembry, 
mind you; the other one), and a 
little wilted lettuce. 

But the pho — woah. And cheap, 
too. So that's a good place. You 


should eat pho there. But not rolls. 

Second, Chicken Farmer was 
very impressed by a place I took her 
to in Los Angeles the other week. 

It was the meal we had before we 
went to win our award. Place called 
Sabina's European Restaurant, on 
the corner of Vine and Fountain in 
one of those strip mall things that 
constitute 90% of Los Angeles. 

The other 10% being Joel 
Silver's ego. 

Anyway, Sabina's does not actu¬ 
ally represent all of Europe, cuisine- 
wise. It's exclusively Romanian. 

So exclusively, in fact, that they 
don't even know what pierogis are. 
What they do know is how to stuff a 
cabbage and paprika up some chick¬ 
en. And dumplings! Boy Howdy do 
they ever! 

And get this: everything on 
the menu is $5.75 or cheaper. Yes, 
it is still 2012! Huge portions, too! 
Just ask Kayday. We couldn't finish 
everything and still fit into our red 
carpet gowns, so we took it to go 
and left it in her rental car while we 
went in to the event and achieved 
everlasting fame and glory. 

And man, did that car smell 
funky when we got back in it. 

CHEAP EATS continued... 

Whoa, Hedgehog. Whoa! Do you real¬ 
ly want to drag Hannibal Lector into 
this? Not to mention Boy Howdy. 

Still, it's your best Cheap Sports 
yet, in that you didn't say Word One 
about anything sporty. If I didn't 
know better, I might think you were 
finally making your play for my job. 

Wait... Are you? 

If so, next time focus on the 
jalapenos. I would have said how 
we only needed one little slice to 
spice up the whole big bowl of pho 
to a sweat-inducing, sinus-scouring, 
head-spinning pitch. How often are 
jalapenos even hot at all, let alone 
rip-roaringly hot. So hurray for 
Oriental for knowing how to pick 
out a good one. 

But, really, Berkeley be damned, 
my new favorite restaurant is 
Sabina's, in Hollywood. So let's 
make another movie. Quick, sfbg 

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PICKS 


WEDNESDAY 12/5 

JILL TRACY 

Spooky chanteuse Jill Tracy describes 
her new holiday release, Silver Smoke , 
Star of Night, as 'The Christmas 
album for those who prefer the 
October chill." She celebrates its 
release with three festive events, 
starting with tonight's "Fragrance: 
The Allure and Magical History of 
Perfumes," an after-hours party at 
the San Francisco Conservatory of 
Flowers. The evening is both concert 
and launch of her limited-edition 
fragrances (appropriately, devoted to 
"dark elegance"), created with local 
perfumers Nocturne Alchemy. Sat/8, 
the Hypnodrome (where Tracy has 
been known to perform with the 
Thrillpeddlers) hosts "Creepshow 
Christmas" — a family-friendly 
show mixing ghost stories with 
live accompaniment. Finally, Silver 
Smoke's official CD release shindig is 



Dec. 19 at the DNA Lounge. Spirits 
will be bright! (Cheryl Eddy) 

Tonight, 6-10pm, $13 
San Francisco Conservatory of Flowers 
Golden Gate Park, 100 John F. Kennedy 
Dr., SF 

Sat/8, 8pm, $13-$25 
Hypnodrome 
575 10th St., SF 
www.jilltracy.com 

WEDNESDAY 12/5 

BLUE SCHOLARS 

The young MCs in Seattle rap duo 
Blue Scholars met, quite appro¬ 
priately, in a hip-hop club at the 
University of Washington. You 
can hear these academic roots 
clearly in DJs Sabzi and Geologic's 
smart, searing rhymes. The heady 
lyrical content of their work 
tackles serious, political issues 
such as socioeconomic mobility, 
empowerment, and questioning 
authority. Even more impressively, 
these boys don't just talk the talk. 
Geologic's history of activism in 
the Filipino-American commu¬ 
nity and the duo's headquarters 
in 98118, the country's most 

16 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 


WATCH THE TOYS. 


FOR MORE VISIT 

SFBG.COM 



ethnically diverse zip code, is the 
perfect recipe for the smart, rel¬ 
evant hip-hop that the scene most 
desperately needs (we're look¬ 
ing at you, Chris Brown). (Haley 
Zaremba) 

With The Physics, Brothers From Another 

8pm, $19.50 

Fillmore 

1805 Geary, SF 

(415) 346-6000 

www.thefillmore.com 



WEDNESDAY 12/5 


comedy — ABBA sing-offs, mock- 
epic speeches — but none more 
memorable than the two actors 
going head to head with their 
Caine impressions: "You were only 
supposed to blow the bloody doors 
off!" Truly, an inspired double fea¬ 
ture. (Cheryl Eddy) 

Get Carter 2:40 and 7pm; The Trip 4:50 
and 9:10pm, $8.50-$ll 
Castro Theatre 
429 Castro, SF 
www.castrotheatre.com 

THURSDAY 12/6 

“DRAG QUEENS ON ICE” 

It's a bird! It's a plane! It's... er, 
definitely something, flying at you 
with the unstoppable momentum 
of a two-story wig and a pair of 
birdseed-filled balloons. You already 
know what's green and ice skates 


(Peggy Phlegm) now come find out 
what's queen and ice wobbles — all 
those years in man-stilletos can't 
help you out on the rink, honey. 

This cherished annual hoot features 
a wealth of San Francisco's beloved 
gender clown personalities threading 
their way through bewildered tourist 
families in Union Square (who actu¬ 
ally get really into it, and by the end 
it's a heartwarming family affair, full 
of squeals of delight). You can even 
skate with these swanning lovelies! 
No money back if you end up with a 
weave in your face. The great Donna 
Sachet — she of the stunning, form¬ 
fitting, fake-fur-trimmed ravishing 
red holiday dress — mistresses the 
ceremonies. Grab a warming adult 
beverage from nearby Emporio Rulli 
II Caffe and join in the fun. But 
don't you dare judge, or you might 
get Nancy Kerrigan'd. Skates are 
blades, remember. (Marke B.) 
8-9:30pm, $10 entrance, $5 rentals 
Union Square Skating Rink 
Post and Geary, SF 
www.unionsquareicerink.com 

THURSDAY 12/6 

THE FAMILY STONE 

I've had some good times listen¬ 
ing to San Francisco's Sly and the 
Family Stone — both letting my 
mind wander the groove of their 
funky sound and feeling the sense 
of pride in one's self that Sly Stone 
sings so well — and I'd venture a 
guess that you have too. Though 
that innovate teacher and leader has 
opted for life out of the spotlight, 
three of the original members, 

Jerry Martini (saxophone), Cynthia 
Robinson (trumpet), and Greg Errico 
(drums), are keeping the music alive 
with the help of a few younger tal¬ 
ents. Mostly hailing from the Las 
Vegas area, these new members are 
all performers with rich experiences 
listening to Sly's music. This new 
Family Stone recreates the old hits 
in a fresh show, hoping to bring 


the music to all generations. (Molly 
Champlin) 

7-8pm, $40-$45 
Rrazz Room 
222 Mason, SF 
(800) 380-3095 
www.therrazzroom.com 

THURSDAY 12/6 

STREETLIGHT 

MANIFESTO 

Streetlight Manifesto was pretty late 
to the ska game, releasing its first 
album in 2003, well over a decade 
after the genre's revival heyday. 
Though in a way, the band's tim¬ 
ing was actually perfect. Born out 
of the ashes of previous Jersey ska- 
punk heroes Catch-22 and One Cool 
Guy, Streetlight's catchy tunes and 
punk rock virility have been nearly 
single-handedly keeping third-wave 
ska alive in a world dominated by 
hip-hop, mainstream pop, and EDM. 
The band is ringing in the new year 
with the release of its fifth album, 



The Hands That Thieve. During this 
tour, Streetlight Manifesto promises 
to play new songs, old favorites, and 
everything in between; so put on 
your skanking shoes and lace 'em 
up tight. It's gonna be a good night. 
(Zaremba) 

With Hostage Calm, Lionize 

8pm,$21 

Slim’s 

333 11th St., SF 
(415) 255-0333 
www.slimspresents.com 


GET CARTER AND THE TRIP 

Verrrry clever, Castro Theatre — 
programming back-to-back screen¬ 
ings of Get Carter (1971) and The 
Trip (2010). Gritty Get Carter follows 
a snarling Michael Caine as he 
prowls around Newcastle, punching 
his way through the local gangster 
contingent he holds responsible 
for his brother's death. The Trip, a 
travelogue featuring Steve Coogan 
and Rob Brydon (playing exag¬ 
gerated versions of themselves), 
contains some genius and quotable 


THE FAMILY STONE 
THURSDAY/6 



EDITORIALS 

NEWS 

FOOD + DRINK 1 

PICKS 

1 ARTS + CULTURE 

MUSIC LISTINGS 

STAGE LISTINGS 

ON THE CHEAP 

FILM LISTINGS 


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PICKS 


FRIDAY 12/7 

HOPE BEYOND 

Kim Larson, artist and gallery director 
at Modern Eden, has curated the one- 
night-only art show, Hope Beyond, a 
benefit for the victims of Hurricane 
Sandy. The assembled line-up includes 
an impressive selection of artists rep¬ 
resenting a variety of pop-surreal and 
contemporary styles. The work ranges 
from the graffiti style sharpie draw¬ 
ings of Kidlew to intricate fusion of 
nature images and Hindi symbolism 
by Inge Vandormael. Personally, Pm 
excited to see what all of these artists 
will contribute to the show. Especially 
Serge Gay Jr. — an artist whose 
paintings collage and reproduce pop 
culture images to create dichotomies 
between what's real and what's fake 
and make you to take a second look 
at his subjects: beauty, violence, 
drugs, and race. With all art priced 
below $100 and the proceeds going to 



Hurricane Sandy victims, what's not 
to love? (Champlin) 

6pm, free 

Modern Eden Gallery 
403 Francisco, SF 
(415) 956-3303 
www.hope-beyond.com 

FRIDAY 12/7 

SFBALLET’S 

NUTCRACKER 

The folks in Imperial Russia loved 
The Nutcracker and kept it alive dur¬ 
ing Soviet times. But the West never 
saw it until some White Russians, 
who had escaped to San Francisco, 
nagged then San Francisco Ballet 
Artistic Director Wiliam Christensen 
to choreograph it in 1944. By now 
there are hundreds of versions all 
over the world; the oddest one I ever 
saw had Drosselmeyer arrive on a 
spaceship. SFB's, choreographed by 
Helgi Tomasson in 2004, is set dur¬ 
ing the 1915 Panama International 
Exhibition. It lacks the cloying 
sweetness and sentimentality that 
infects so many others. Tomasson's 
is a love letter to the City — cool, 

EDITORIALS | NEWS | FOOD + DRINK 


JILL TRACY PHOTO BY AUDREY PENVEN; BLUE SCHOLARS PHOTO BY CANH SOLO; JOHN CALE PHOTO BY SHAWN BRACKBILL; 
HOPE BEYOND ‘SPACE VAMPIRE’ BY ANA BAGAYAN; MISFIT TOY FACTORY PHOTO BY ROOT DIVISION. 


FOR MORE VISIT 

SFBG.COM 



transparent, a little reserved and 
superbly elegant. (Rita Felciano) 
Through Dec. 28, 7pm, 2pm matinees; 
$20-$270 

War Memorial Opera House 
301 Van Ness, SF 
(415) 865-2000 

warmemorial.boxofficesanfrancisco.com 

SATURDAY 12/8 

MISFIT TOY FACTORY II 

Did you ever feel cheated as a kid 
when you would see cartoons and 
hear stories about elves making toys 
from scratch, then you got a Barbie 
doll or video game that obviously 
wasn't cobbled at the North Pole? 
Well, now is your chance to watch 
the toys actually being made. Not 
by elves though, but by local art¬ 
ists. There will be over 35 of them 
at Root Division Art Space bringing 
creativity from their various fields 



(painting, sculpture, and illustration 
mostly) to the art of toy making. All 
the work will be sold for a flat rate of 
$40. Bring cash for some shopping, 
or just come to enjoy the atmosphere 
of creativity complete with music by 
DJ Yukon Cornelius. (Champlin) 

6pm, free 

Root Division Art Space 
3175 17th, SF 
(415) 863-7668 
www.rootdivision.org 


SATURDAY 12/8 

JOHN PRINE 

I think I need to start with a dis¬ 
claimer: I love John Prine. Yes, I'm 
completely biased when I say that he 
is one of the greatest living lyricists 
and you'd be lucky to go see him. 

But why take my word for it? His 
more than 40 years of successful 
songwriting can speak for them¬ 
selves. Starting off as a Chicago-area 
postman doing open mics in his 
spare time, Prine eventually got 
noticed — by a young Roger Ebert. 
Now, almost 70 years after that glow¬ 
ing review, Prine is still an incredible 
songwriter and performer, and each 
song is a charming, witty, and poi¬ 
gnant labor of love. In his time as a 
performer, many trends and genres 
have come and gone, but a great 
folk song never goes out of style. 
(Zaremba) 

With Justin Townes Earle 

8pm,$39-$59 

Warfield 

982 Market, SF 

(415) 345-0900 

www.thewarfieldtheatre.com 

SUNDAY 12/9 

SAN FRANCISCO 
CRAB FEST 2012 

Continuing a long-running San 
Francisco tradition that takes advan¬ 
tage of the fact that the crab fishing 
season along the California coast 
coincides with the holiday season, 
the Fisherman's Wharf Community 
Benefit District 2012 Crab Fest will 
offer up a tasty fete featuring the 
crustacean prepared in a variety of 
ways by local restaurants, along with 
exhibits, cooking demonstrations 
and more. A host of sustainably-pro¬ 
duced regional wines will provide 


the perfect way to raise a toast to 
the annual event, which donates 
all proceeds to the San Francisco 
Firefighters Toy Program and the San 
Francisco Police Department's Youth 
Fishing Program. (Sean McCourt) 
Noon-3pm, $25-$30 
Waterfront Terraces, Fisherman’s Wharf 
145 Jefferson St., Third Floor, SF 
www.visitfishermanswharf.com 

SUNDAY 12/9 

QUEER REBELS 
WINTER SHINDIG 

Though the weather outside is fright¬ 
ful, the smolderingly creative queers 
performing tonight at El Rio are more 
than capable of keeping your toasty 
warm. The lineup alone is worth the 
sleigh ride to El Rio — burlesque from 
the bountiful Ms. Vagina Jenkins, 
jazzy moves courtesy East Bay punker 
Brontez Purnell, the release per¬ 
formance of drag king blueser K.B. 
TuffNStuff's Trans of Venus album, 
and so much more hotness. But as if 
that wasn't enough to draw you like a 
moth to flame, this: the evening is a 
benefit for Queer Rebels' year-round 
lineup of genderbending, empower¬ 
ing art events like the Exploding 


Lineage! experimental film fest, two- 
day summit of Asian American activ¬ 
ists, and the group's annual epony¬ 
mous production of queer takes on 
the Harlem Renaissance and beyond. 
(Caitlin Donohue) 

8-llpm, $7-20 sliding scale 
El Rio 

3158 Mission, SF 
www.elriosf.com 

SUNDAY 12/9 

JOHN CALE 

Whereas Lou Reed was the primary 
source of the Velvet Underground's 
swagger, and hard-bitten lyricism, 
John Cale took charge of the group's 
more avant-garde leanings. Even 45 
years after leaving the band, Cale 
continues to challenge and surprise 
his listeners, as evidenced by the title 
of his latest LP: Shifty Adventures 
in Nookie Wood. Largely devoid of 
the splintering bursts of noise that 
defined his formative years, and the 
rootsy pastoralism of Paris 1919 and 
Vintage Violence, Cale's latest is an 
art-rock record in the tradition of 
Peter Gabriel and Kate Bush: affect¬ 
ing in its ability to experiment and 
take risks while working squarely 
within the pop template. Another 
gutsy effort from an aging icon 
whose renegade streak hasn't gone 
anywhere. See him while you can. 
(Taylor Kaplan) 

With Cass McCombs 
8pm,$32-$48 
Regency 
1290 Sutter, SF 
(888) 929-7849 

www.theregencyballroom.com sfbg 

The Guardian listings deadline is two weeks prior 
to our Wednesday publication date. To submit 
an item for consideration, please include the 
title of the event, a brief description of the event, 
date and time, venue name, street address 
(listingcrossstreetsonly isn’t sufficient), city, 
telephone number readers can call for more 
information, telephone numberfor media, and 
admission costs. Send information to Listings, 
the Guardian, 225 Bush, 17th Fir., SF, CA 
94105; ore-mail (paste press release intoe-mail 
body — no attachments, please) to listings® 
sfbg.com. Digital photos may be submitted in 
jpeg format; the image must be at least 240 dpi 
and four inches by six inches in size. We regret 
we cannot accept listings overthe phone. 





























KURABO BLACK 13 OUNCE MENS 

DENIM PANTS. $128 

The perfect pair of pants, proudly 
produced in SF by Taylor Stitch (383 
Valencia, SF. www.taylorstitch.com) 
for stylish gents? Possibly. Dig the local 
provenance — Taylor Stitch is burst¬ 
ing with hometown-made style. And 
the deep black will hide unsightly rain 
splashes. 


Stay haute with our picks for braving the cold. 


BY MARKE B. AND CAITUN DONOHUE I culture@sfbg.com 


CAT WALKING STICK UMBRELLA. $30 

Yes, yes, we get the raining cats and dogs joke, 
but this is the purrfect shield against the storm: 
a sky-blue kitty cavorting on a midnight blue 
canvas, protecting you on this seriously sturdy 
yet lightweight piece from the San Francisco 
Umbrella Company (www.sfumbrella .com). 


RAINSHIELD 02 UNISEX 

CYCLING JACKET. $25 

Ultralightweight, breathable, pack- 
able, and insanely cute, these zip- 
ups, available at Market Street 
Cyclery (1592 Market, SF. www. 
marketstreetcyclescom) will keep 
the drops off your pop-a-wheelie 
while helping up your mist- 
shrouded visibility factor. 


OTTER WAX BAR. $13 

Ditch the wet look and feel: 
wax your sneakers, jeans, and 
canvas or denim clothing. 

Seal in that fresh feeling — 
also available in heat-activated 
dressing form — at Voyager 
(365 Valencia, SF. www.thev- 
oyagershop.com). Just rub it 
on and you'll be fly and dry. 

SAN FRANPSYCHO 

BEANIE. $20 

We found you an everyday hat 
straight from the surfer-bros of 
San Franpsycho, whose shop 
(505 Divisadero, SF. www. 
sanfranpsycho.com) sells the 
makings of insta-cred among 
sporty, hip types in town. 


VAUTE 
COUTURE 

EMILY 

COAT. 
$356.25 

We swoon for 
this online 
brand's 
(www.vaut- 
ecouture. 
com) ani¬ 
mal prod¬ 
uct-free 
— no 
itchy 
woolens 
or dead 
cow 
here! 

— fashion. 
Thanks to 
the Emily's 
tie-front belt, 
winter-time no 
longer means 
you have to look 
like a shapeless 
sack of spuds. 


BENEDUCI HANK BOOTS. INQUIRE FOR PRICE 

These brass tack soles will power you down winter-wet sidewalks but 
honestly, you could rock Beneduci's (www.beneduci.com) Italian leath¬ 
er kicks year-round in style. Local cred: the brand makes everything 


MARINE LAYER HI-LO 
CROPPED SWEATER. $88 

American Apparel's appeal 
fades when we discovered 
this line of comfy basics 
made right here in the 
city. Marine Layer (2209 
Chestnut, SF; 498 Hayes, 

SF. www.marinelayer.com) 
specializes in men's and 
women's tees, but we love 
its warm-yet-trendy cropped 
sweater, whose hemline dips 
low in the back. 


PAUL MADONNA CANVAS 

SHOULDER BAG. $23 

Local cartoonist Madonna's 
"All Over Coffee" comic and 
books are essential — his 
illustration of the Golden 
Gate Bridge one Crissy Lield 
on this kicky bag is a spar¬ 
kling example of his art, 
available at one of our favor¬ 
ite bookstores ever, Green 
Arcade (1680 Market, SL. 
www.thegreenarcade.com) 


JENNIFER BAIR JACKET. $124 

These one-of-a-kind faux suede 
coats with vintage-inspired print 
lining make great cover-ups on 
milder winter days. Residents 
Apparel Gallery's (541 Octavia, 
SF. www.ragsf.com) selection of 
made-in-the-city pieces is a great 
one-stop shop for Bay Area gear. 


10 WINTER ESSENTIALS 


18 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 


EDITORIALS j NEWS j FOOD + DRINK j PICKS 


ARTS + CULTURE 


MUSIC LISTINGS j STAGE LISTINGS j ON THE CHEAP I FILM LISTINGS j CLASSIFIEDS 



















































ARTS + CULTURE: STREET SEEN 


MODELS KELLY DEZART SMITH AND VIRGIE TOVAR GUARDIAN FASHION PHOTOS BY 

CABURE BONUGLI (SHOT IN THE CITY); PHOTOS OF SAN FRANCISCO BY REYNALDO CAYETANO JR. 



KELLY 

Teenplotop, Ambiance 
Necklace, scarf, sunglasses, Arcam 
Bracelet, Painted Bird 


VIRGIE 

B. B. Dakota sweater, Ambiance 
Hat, Arcam; Zad necklace, Ambiance 


ICY HOT 
FASHION 

A club kid stylist, some seriously fly models, 
and seven perfect winter looks 



HOTS BURLESQUE $5-10 
OMGIKAfl (E nos 
CRESCENT BANKS, 

IZODIAC DEATH VALtEY (ROCK) $5 


WORTH TAKING, 

THE FODRTH ND KING, 
WILLIAM DUPLAIN (POP/ROCK) $5 


I FREE OYSTERS ON THE HALF SHELL 

DJ’S CARMEN&MIRANDA 

(FUNK/DISCO/POP) NOS 

RED HOTS BURLESQUE 
:RD AN CE PARTY 


NOS 


" TRACING FIGURES 
IN LETTER FORM. 

THE FAMILY FLAW 

(ALT ROCK/ROCK) $5 _ 

"SALSA SUNDAYS,™ 
LATIDO! DEMOTIONS 

AND FREE DANCE CLASS 

8pm QUEER REBELS WINTER SHINDIG 


$1 PBR/S2 WELL DOLLAR DAY, ALL DAY 
COMEDY RETURNS TO ELRIO 

RADICAL VINYL 

DJ’S SPIN FUNK+HIPHOP. OLDIES+PUNK! NOS 

WARM SODA. MEAT MARKET, 
PRIMITIVE HEARTS 

(GARAGE/POP) $7 

ALL STAR JAM WITH 
LOS TRAINWRECKnos 


3158 Mission Street, S.H 

elriosf.com 415-282-3325 


Nisssss LOUNGE stsstss 

1695 POLK SX 


FRIDAY 12/7 

PRICE AND MICHAEL EXPERIENCE 

DJ DAVE PAUL 


THURSDAY 12/13 

THE MOTELS 


SATURDAY 12/15 

FASCINATION 

EXPLORATIONS IN ELECTRO, EARLY NEWWAVE AND FUNK 

DJ DAVE PAUL 


FIR DAY 12/21 

THE CHEESEBALLS 

THE PURPLE ONES 


SATURDAY 12/22 

NOTORIOUS 

80'S AND MORE 


NEW YEAR'S EVE 12/31 

POP ROCKS 


NEW YEAR'S EVE 12/31 

P-® TAINTED LOVE 


SATURDAY 1/12 

THE UNTOUCHABLES 


WEDNESDAY 1/23 

MIDGE URE 

THE VOICE OF ULTRAVOX 


EVERY TUESDAY 
OPEN MIC SIGN UP AT 7PM 

San Francisco’s best open mic. 

Get your songs professionally recorded 


EDITORIALS 


NEWS ! FOOD + DRINK j PICKS 


ARTS + CULTURE 


MUSIC LISTINGS I STAGE LISTINGS I ON THE CHEAP j FILM LISTINGS j CLASSIFIEDS 


DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 / SFBG.COM 19 




















































HEMLOCK 


1131 Polk st | 

Dtwn Kost & butter 
V 415.923.0923 

WED Dec 5 

CLOSED for private party 

Thu Dec 6 
8:30pm $6 

KUSF In Exile presents: 

METRO MICTLAN 

Suzuki Junzo (of Miminokoto, 
Japan), Numinous Eye 

Fri Dec 7 
9:30pm $7 

NIGHT GENES 

White Teeth, Youth of the Beast 

Sat Dec 8 
9:30pm $7 

LECHEROUS GAZE 

Owl, Wild Eyes 

Sun Dec 9 
6pm $5 

CUMSTAIN 

The Be-Helds (Burger), 
Grandma's Boyfriend 

Mon Dec 10 
9:30pm FREE 

PUNK ROCK SIDESHOW 

Tue Dec 11 
8:30pm $6 

NORTH FORK 

Scatter Gather, one f 

Wed Dec 12 
8:30pm $6 

BIG LONG NOW 

Ghost Parade, Light Thieves 

Thu Dec 13 
8:30pm $6 

OCEANOGRAPHY 

The Swells, Wilding 

Fri Dec 14 
9:30pm $7 

CASE STUDIES (ex-Duchess 
& the Duke), Bolas (w/Meric 
Long), David Enos 

Sat Dec 15 
9:30pm $7 

RELIGIOUS GIRLS 

Free Moral Agents, Hawk Jones 

NEW YEAR'S EVE BASH 

w/Terry Malts, Toys That Kill, Pins of Light 

UPCOMING: Your Heart Breaks, Nana Grizol,One 
Hundred Percent, Station & The Monster, Fuzz, 
Hatchet, Chad & The Meat Bodies, Space Waves, Venus 
Beltran, Holidays From Hell Burlesque, Tidelands, 
Yassou Benedict, The Sporting Life, Love Dimension, 

www.hemlocktavern.com 



SF COMEDY SHOWCASE - EVERY SUNDAY! 



THURSDAY 12/6 ■ SATURDAY 12/8 
THE PITBULL OF COMEDY IS BACK! 

BOBBY SLAYTON 

ROBERT DUCHAINE, MAX CURRY 


TUESDAY 12/11 

HA HA HOLIDAY 
HEATHENS 

KEITH LOWELL JENSEN, CONOR KELLICUTT, JASON WHEELER 




WEDNESDAY 12/12 ■ SATURDAY 12/15 
FROM SULLIVAN & SONS, AND LAST COMIC STANDING! 

ROY WOOD JR. 

KABIR SINGH, GRANT LYON 



FRIDAY 12/28 ■ MONDAY 12/31 

GREG PROOPS- 
NEW YEAR'S EVE! 

* LIVE PODCAST TAPING ON SUNDAY 



$0 YEARS OF 
STANIMJPCOMEPY! 




WWWCOmCOMEPYCOM 
FOLLOW US ON 
.TWITTER AW FACEWOK! 


CEIEPRATINC- OUR 3Q1H ANNIVERSARY FOR AH OF 20 1 21 

THURSDAY 12/6 ST 

COMEDY ** 

SMORGASBORD 

Kabir Singh, David Studebaker & more _ 

FRIDAY 12/7 - SUNDAY 12/9 -- 

JIM BREUER * 

Comedy Central’s “lOO Greatest 

Stand-Ups Of All Time” _ 


THURSDAY 12/13 - SATURDAY 12/15 W "W 

RICHARD LEWIS I ! 1 

From Curb Your Enthusiasm! Wx * l 
FRIDAY 12/28 - MONDAY 12/31 - = " 

JOHN OLIVER- ^ 
NEW YEAR’S EVE! 


Call the box office for no service charges! 
j," _ _,x_ „ Limit 8 tickets per person. All dates, acts and 

ZICKGtn^aSZGT ticket prices are subject to change without 
™ 1 notice. All tickets are subject to applicable 


ARTS + CULTURE: STREET SEEN 


MODEL MARIE BRAND GUARDIAN FASHION PHOTOS BY CABURE BONUGLI (SHOT IN THE CITY); 
PHOTOS OF SAN FRANCISCO BY REYNALDO CAYETANO JR. 



MARIE, LEFT 

Pendleton knit muffler, Unionmade/Mill 
Patagonia Nano Puff jacket, Unionmade 
Purse, loco. 


MARIE, ABOVE 

Fada necklace, Ambiance 
Zad bracelet, Ambiance 
Icco purse, Ambiance 
Dress, Mission Thrift 


GET THE LOOK 

Ambiance, various SF locations, www.ambiancesf.com 
Arcam, facebook.com/arcamsf 

Freeman’sSportingClub, 696 Valencia, SF. (415) 863-2155, 
shop.freemanssportingclub.com 

Mill Mercantile, 3751 24 th St., SF. (415) 401-8920, www.millmercantile.com 
Mission Thrift, 2330 Mission, SF. (415) 821-9560 
Painted Bird, 1360 Valencia, SF. (415) 401-7027, www.paintedbird.org 
Unionmade, 493 Sanchez, SF. www.unionmadegoods.com 


20 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 


EDITORIALS ! NEWS j FOOD + DRINK I PICKS 


ARTS + CULTURE 


MUSIC LISTINGS i STAGE LISTINGS j ON THE CHEAP i FILM LISTINGS I CLASSIFIEDS 






































































ARTS + CULTURE: STREET SEEN 


MODELS ANTON MARTINEZ, RYAN, AND KELLY DEZART SMITH 

GUARDIAN FASHION PHOTOS BY CABURE BONUGLI (SHOT IN THE CITY) 


ANTON 

Isabel Lu top, Ambiance 

Bag, Freeman’s Sporting Goods x 
Dewar’s limited edition 


Sunglasses, necklace, Arcam. 


RYAN 

i RTH market tote, Mill Mercantile 
V Tracy Reece dress, Ambiance 
Earrings, Arcam 


PHOTOS OF SAN FRANCISCO 
BY REYNALDO CAYETANO JR. 


KELLY 

Imogene & Willie Overfield shooting 
jacket, Mill Mercantile 

Glasses, clawed gloves, necklace, 
Arcam 


; I© 1 ®? f- 


- f ; 

I I 

! 1 


STREET SEEN Our 

stylist for this 
week's "Icy 
Hot" photo¬ 
shoot Dick 
Van Dick 
was a 


little 


twerked 
from 
the party 
scene the night 
before, but in order 
to properly express 
the fashion aesthetic of 
his Arcam style collective, 
he was good enough to indulge 
me with a single quote. 

"I believe in the power of the ret¬ 
rospective fashion sense," the Bay Area 


native texted me. "Nothing new ever hap¬ 
pens. Recycle, reuse, resell." Read: vin 
tage couture, the eternal refuge of 
the low budget club kid. 

Van Dick has been snap¬ 
ping necks with his vogue 
ball club kids designs 
of late. Mesh face 
masks attached to 
Rainbow Brite- 
neon weaves 
are his 
signa 


ture, 
fly 

accoutre¬ 
ment that 
is perfectly 
soundtracked by 
"Rok U Baby," the 
vogue track he just com 
pleted with recent Goldie 
winner, Matrixxman of DJ duo 
5kinandbone5. 

For our shoot — which took place 
in the charming Tendernob apartment 


of photographer Cabure Bonugli on a 
grey afternoon — we asked that Van 
Dick incorporate pieces from local 
stores into his fierce looks. But he 
did pepper the models with 
the studded berets and 
clawed leather gloves 
that he makes to 
order for inter¬ 
ested clientele 
and sells 
along¬ 
side 


his 

thrift 
store 
finds. 
Hard werk- 
ers, cop this 
for the win¬ 
ter. (Caitlin 
Donohue) 


EDITORIALS 


NEWS 


FOOD + DRINK 


ARTS + CULTURE 


MUSIC LISTINGS 


STAGE LISTINGS 


ON THE CHEAP 


FILM LISTINGS 


CLASSIFIEDS 


DECEMBER 5 - 11, 2012 / SFBG.COM 21 



















































ARTS + CULTURE: NIGHTLIFE 


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: VAIN HEIN, DIA DEAR, AND BOY CHILD CHOP AND SCREW DRAG PERFORMANCE. 

PHOTO OF VAN HEIN BY ERIC HARVIEUX 



BY MARKEB. 

marke@sfbg.com 

SUPER EGO Scene: Midnight, Tiara Sensation 
drag pageant, Rickshaw Stop, September. A 
naked, enormously white-and-purple-bewigged 
figure in two-foot-high Plexiglass heels, laid 
across three raised Plexiglass pillars, faces away 
from us. The pitched down strains of Frank 
Ocean's "Pyramid," his voiced syrupped into a 
slo-mo Judy Garland phantasmagoria, drown 
us in waves of bass. Sheee's wooorkiiing at the 
Pyyyramid toniiiight. 

Awkwardly, riskily the figure rises almost to 
the rafters, its back still to us, spreads its legs, and 
begins to pull a tangled string of multicolored 
Christmas lights from her crotch. It performs 
this deliberately, turning the Rickshaw stage into 
a pressure cooker of strobe lights, sexual horror, 
and incipient danger — a strip club where no 
one can hear you scream. The atmosphere is so 
tense that when the figure finally turns around 
to reveal her eyeless, bloody-mouthed, death pale 
self, as Ocean's voice tweaks a level higher, shiv¬ 
ers and gasps run right through the audience. 
Shiva the Great Destroyer, her tits bound with 
duct tape, a makeshift pouch at her crotch the 
source of her glittering lights. 

It all probably cost $5. And it's emblematic 
of a new glitchy-nightmare drag style (or the 
reboot of one) that's bewitching clubgoers. 

The performer was the amazing Dia Dear, 
one of a number of recent young arrivals who've 
zapped nightlife to another level by unselfcon¬ 
sciously — and quite organically — raiding the 
shelves of performance art, horror films, contem¬ 
porary R&B, club kid history, and the Walgreen's 
down the street to create cheap yet striking 
personae for themselves, and electrify the city's 
drag stages. They're also so fucking smart it 
scares me, no Christmas crotch lights required. 

Drag as confrontational, sometimes blood- 
spilling performance art has a long history here, 
of course, from the Cockettes in the 1970s, 
through the Popstitute and Club Uranus scenes 
in the early '90s, to Trannyshack in the '00s. 

It's currently found a home at the Some Thing 
party every Friday at the Stud and High Fantasy 
every Tuesday at Aunt Charlie's. Iconic, sensi¬ 
bility-scrambling club kid styles like those of 
Michael Alig, Desi Monster, James St. James, our 
own Phatima Rude and Ggreg Taylor, and the 
ultimate drag inverter-perverter Leigh Bowery 
are all the rage in this retro-minded, post-Gaga 
moment. But something about this fresh wave, 
something about how it's coming from people 
with no nightlife background at all, is different. 
Drag stages have become the affordable breed¬ 
ing ground for committed performance artists, 
expressing essential truths about our moment. 
Lipsyncing is so last century. 

"I never even knew who Leigh Bowery was 
until people started mentioning his name this 
summer," Boy Child, another of this new 
tribe, told me over the phone. (I live next door 
to her, and it's not rare to find a neon-yellow 
spray-painted birdcage, a chandelier made of 
wigs, or an entire store display case sitting 
outside, waiting to become part of a perspec¬ 
tive-shattering outfit or brandished onstage 
in a cyber-Wiccan, dystopian android ritual.) 


Like Dia, Boy Child just started going out to 
clubs this year — pretty much arriving out of 
nowhere, both of them declining to share their 
pasts — and when she did she was almost fully 
formed as a stage presence, with a genius sense 
of makeup and a cerebral agenda. 

"Everything I do is a reaction to being cate¬ 
gorized: as black, as a female-bodied queer," she 
said. "It's really bad right now, because it's so 
hip to be black. I feel I encounter so much that 
makes me angry just existing in this world as 
a queer creature. My perfomance and look ties 
everything to my experience through my body. 
That's where I express myself most fluidly, more 
acutely and vividly than through language." 

"Horror is where I'm coming from and 
where I exist," Vain Hein, another performer 
told me. Unlike Boy Child and Dia Dear, Vain 
Hein is open about his past: raised as a Born 
Again Christian in both Puget Sound and 
Phoenix, Arizona — "My childhood consisted 
of traveling between extremes" — he eventually 
found his way to the San Francisco Art Institute 
to study New Genres (this is actually a program 
there!) Vain Hein, who also performs to music 
he chops and screws at home, most explicitly 
ties sex to horror in his work — it's chockful of 
surprise lactations, menstrual blood, live births, 
prosthetic triple breasts, and weird asses. "I 
think a lot about the apocalypse, it's how I filter 
and understand the world. Decay, destruction — 
everything I wear is just what's at hand around 
my house, held together with scotch tape and 
nail glue, the shitty, shitty, shittest things ever 
that just fall apart during the night, even when 
I'm not performing. I literally shed my skin." 

Yet even as a queer art student in San 
Francisco, liberated from fundamentalism, he 
never went out until this year. "I just had pre¬ 
conceived notions about what going to a gay 
club involved. Then my friend dragged me to a 


drag show last spring, and I was like, 'I can do 
this.' I had studied mostly performance art and 
video so it was a good fit." 

Being a young queer and not going to the 
clubs is incomprehensible to me — but of course 
these 20-somethings grew up with the Internet, 
where you can be gay by yourself, and which 
looms like a Poltergeist vortex over their work. 

"Oh, the vast blessing of the Internet," 

Boy Child half-laughs. "I wish I was better at 
it. We're so bombarded with information and 
images, just so much shit. That can be great 
because my generation has all of the past avail¬ 
able. But we've been drowning in this stream 
of complete crap, too. I can define myself as a 
freaky-freak just by how I navigate it. But the 
power of live performance is channeling all 
that into immediate emotion, a moment when 
everyone's together, something that can't and 
should never be documented as just images." 

The charming and soft-spoken Dia Dear, 
who has become kind of a mother the nascent 
phantasmic drag scene — even though she, like 
Boy Child and Vain Hein, prefers to operate 
outside traditional mother-daughter drag family 
structures — says, "I haven't quite figured out 
my relationship to the Internet. I feel like it's a 
positive tool because it can connect us to the 
spirit of people who are dead. But it's also this 
kind of dark rectangle in the corner that can 
suck out all your energy. It exists for its own 
sake. But to be on the Internet now, you have to 
have a certain level of narcissism and self-inter¬ 
est. A lot like you have to have as a performer. 
Performance and the Internet should be natural 
lovers, in a sense. Twisted together ...entwined." 

DISQUIET NIGHT 

This live experimental music concert at the 
Luggage Store Gallery is the brainchild of 
one of the brainiest yet approachable people 
I know, Marc Weidenbaum, who started 


his fascinating daily music site, Disquiet, 
com, 15 years ago — way before blogs were 
invented. His project Disquiet Junto challenges 
Soundcloud members to respond to a prompt 
with unique compositions. This round: field 
recordings of Hurricane Sandy, with Cullen 
Miller, Subnaught, Jared Smith, and more. 
Thu/6, 8pm-10pm, $6-$10 sliding scale. 

Luggage Store Gallery, 1007 Market, SF. www. 
luggagestoregallery.org 

DEE-TOY 

Over the past year we've been treated to some 
tasty South African contemporary dance music 
flavor, from Black Coffee to Die Antewoord. 
(Somebody please get the Tshetsha Boys out 
here!) DJ Dee-toy, of Sebokeng Township con¬ 
tinues this great microtrend with deep, deep 
house vibes and off-your-seat Afrofunk jams. 
Fri/7, 10pm-4am, $15-$20. Mighty, 119 Utah, SF. 
afrofunk.eventbrite.com 

GIGAMESH 

Yeah, yeah, the phenomenally successful 
Minneapolitan remixes pop hits into slick little 
machines of hummable electro-disco bliss. He 
is also very, very fun. 

Fri/7, 10pm-3am, $15-$20. Monarch, 101 Sixth St., 
SF. www.monarchsf.com 

TORMENTA TROPICAL 5-YEAR 

ANNIVERSARY 

This monthly party launched the nu-cumbia 
sound in SF, splashing some much-needed 
Latin electronica onto our shores, while intro¬ 
ducing global bass to a new generation of 
underground-minded clubgoers. Some major 
players have stomped the floor here, and quite 
a few sonic permutations of TT's sound have 
found more mainstream success — but found¬ 
ers Shawn Reynaldo and oroll, who brought 
their inspiration directly from Argentina, are 
keeping it crazy and real with a marathon tag- 
team set in celebration. 

Sat/8, 10pm, $5 before 10pm, $10 after. Elbo 
Room, 647 Valencia, SF. www.elbo.com 

ACCIDENTAL BEAR! 

Gay people won't stop rapping and blogging, 
and that's OK! It's fun. Our favorite local blogger 
(and perpetual crush) Mike "Accidental Bear" 
Enders covers way too much ground online. Now 
the super-enthusiastic cutie is celebrating two 
years of cybergossip by hosting a cartoon-colored 
gay rapstravaganza with Big Dipper, Rica Shay, 
and MC Crumbsnatcher, plus singer Tim Carr 
and DJs Medic and Dav-0 of Double Duchess. 
There'll be a lot of cute gay guys with beards. 
Sat/8, 9pm, $3. Truck, 1900 Folsom, SF. www. 
accidentalbear.com 

ATTACK OF THE TYPEWRITERS 

Writer, drinker, arts-minded political activist, 
and bon vivant Hiya Swanhuyser is combining 
her interests in this neato, monthly, poten¬ 
tially wonderfully absurd thingie. Come to 
the Makeout Room, grab a drink, and then 
bang out a letter to any politician you have 
beef with. "One letter = 100 votes," she says. 
Cocktails and truth to power, yasss. She'll bring 
the actual, clickety-clackety typewriters! You 
bring the drink-fueled rage! 

Tue/11, 6pm-8pm, free. Makeout Room, 3225 22nd 
St., SF. www.tinyurl.com/typeattack sfbg 


22 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 


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ARTS + CULTURE: VISUAL ART 


SCENES FROM THE STREETS OF SAN FRANCISCO: 

FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN ARTISTS IS AN EQUATION OF LOVE AND SURVIVAL 


BY ERICK LYLE 

arts@sfbg.com 

VISUAL ART It starts with the streets. 
Walls, the texture of walls, rough 
and colored in swirls of graffiti let¬ 
ters. Walls you feel you could reach 
out and touch their cold and grit. 
Establishing shots — the streets of 
San Francisco in the dot-com era. The 
photos are of their times: an unat¬ 
tended shopping cart in the streets 
appears as early as page three. Soon 
follows the spray-painted legend, 

"Don't let the good times fool you." 

The pictures are inscrutable, 
their sequence seemingly random. 
Yet other than the gnomic title 
(Friendship Between Artists is an 
Equation of Love and Survival), the 
only text in Xara Thustra's self- 
published new book's 500 pages is a 
brief intro from the author insisting 
that the book is meant to be read 
from left to right, from top and bot¬ 
tom in the order the photos appear. 
There are no captions or prompts 
to lead the viewer. It is the mute 
gravity of the photos that pulls you 
in. What is happening here? It's like 
finding a box of photos on a trash 
pile in the Mission — old furniture, 
clothes out on the curb, a pile of 
books and CDs. Why is all this stuff 
in the trash? Did the owners die? Or 
get evicted? Photos of strangers. You 
go from one photo to the next and 
the outline of a missing life starts to 
appear. What is happening here? 

The action moves in and out of 
the streets, cinematic — the interiors 
dark, claustrophobic. The streets pro¬ 
vide narration. Everything is spray 
painted. Demand Community Control. 
Everything bright , everything clean. 
Everything they build be like fuck you , 
fuck you , fuck you. Familiar everyday 
locations have become enlisted as 
battlegrounds. At the Dolores Park 
tennis courts, someone has hung a 
screen on the fence, painted so that 
it reads "Sink the Ship" in shimmery, 
see-through letters. A subliminal 
message to the tennis players visible 
on the other side? Or a secret signal 
to an unseen underground army? 

Cut to the interior. Some dim 
locations start to become recogniz¬ 
able: a performance crammed into 
a corner of Adobe Books, a crowd 
seen through a doorway at the old 
Needles and Pens. The images are at 
times grainy and low res, like bad 
cell phone photos or surveillance 
camera footage. Much is shot in 
indistinct rooms or hallways, tightly 
cropped. The people in the interiors 
model homemade clothing or stare 
back at us from unmade beds. They 
are dancing in high heels or fuck¬ 
ing each other, holding whips and 



FREE THE FREE 


San Francisco icon Xara Thustra looks back 
at 15 years of underground art 


dildos. No one is smiling. Instead 
they stare defiantly into the camera 
as if to ask, "Who are you to watch? 
Which side are you on?" 

This is not the careless 
and fashionable hedo¬ 
nism of Ryan McGinley 
photos. Instead, like the 
subjects of Nan Goldin 
photos, the people in 
these images know how 
much their search for 
freedom costs, and 
who will have to pay. 

Meanwhile, the 
battle in the streets 
continues. Scum bags 
dressed as imposter yup¬ 
pies stand in front of the mall on 
Market Street, holding handmade 
signs reading, "The bombs are drop¬ 
ping, lets go shopping!" An effigy 


of Gavin Newsom burns at 18th 
and Castro. Back inside, home¬ 
less guys from Fifth and Market 
calmly eat free breakfast at the 949 
Market Squat. More 
drab interiors, more 
surveillance footage, 
and then what is hap¬ 
pening here ? Scenes of 
naked people grimly 
carving designs into 
each other with razors, 
holding dripping, 
bleeding arms up to the 
camera. It must be 2005, 
I think, when we all 
started to give up on ever 
stopping the war and just 
started hurting each other. 

Full disclosure: I am in this 
book. I might be too close to the 
people and events depicted to dis¬ 



cern whether the images are strictly 
documentary or whether their 
arrangement is intended to create 
a new story. But the juxtapositions, 
eerie and dreamlike, pack a wallop. 
In one two page spread, my dead 
friend, Pete Lum, stairs from the 
left page into another photograph 
on the right of an unknown drag 
queen out front of Aunt Charlie's on 
Turk Street. Their eyes seem to meet 
across the gutter of the book and 
across time and space, as if sharing a 
secret the rest of us cannot know. 

Ultimately, perhaps the one 
indisputable narrative of the book is 
the tremendous progression in Xara 
Thustra's artwork, as the early agit¬ 
prop graffiti by "Heart 101" in sup¬ 
port of street protests slowly morphs 
into a far more ambitious project, an 
ongoing collaboration with count¬ 
less others through performance, 
print, and cinema to abandon 
protest and instead collectively 
embody through art the autonomy 
and ethics of a truly different world. 
Perhaps inevitably then, Friendship 
Between Artists is both a monumen¬ 
tal achievement and something of 
an anti-climax. The protests, the 
willful art world obscurity, the dead 
friends — what did it all add up to? 

I am certain, anyway, that 
nothing in the book was conceived 
with the idea that it would one day 
appear in an art book. Instead, the 
interventions, experiments, and pro¬ 
tests detailed herein, while at times 
quite joyous, were, as the book's title 
suggests, originally part of a deadly 
serious struggle to keep oppositional 
culture alive in San Francisco, and 
for many that struggle now feels 
lost. But life must go on, and this is 
no museum piece. 

The book's 500 pages positively 
overflow with life, salvaging from 
oblivion the raw, visceral feel of 15 
years of ephemeral underground 
freedom. While some will be haunted 
by the suspicion that the answer to 
the above question is "not enough," 
the people in these photos stare into 
the camera and demand we consider 
instead a hard-earned and far more 
redemptive possibility: that this isn't 
an art project, it's how we live. This 
isn't representation of a different real¬ 
ity, but about being a different reality. 
And fuck you, anyway, because being 
free is its own reward, sfbg 

For an interview with Xara Thustra\, 
visit sfbg.com/pixel_vision. 

XARA THUSTRA BOOK RELEASE AND SOLO SHOW 

Thu/6, 7-9pm, free 
Needles and Pens 
3252 16th St., SF 
www.needles-pens.com 


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YEP, THOSE ARE DANCING DILDOS: 
1976’S THE FIRST NUDIE MUSICAL 


ARTS + CULTURE: TRASH 


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BY DENNIS HARVEY 

arts@sfbg.com 

TRASH It has been noted that most 
people didn't experience "the 
Sixties" until the Seventies, at 
least in terms of all that Free Love 
and chemical entertainment. But 
even at the latter decade's most 
indulgent junctures, many people's 
minds remained stuck in the Fifties 

— sniggering about the very idea 
of sex, using terms like "boobies," 
insisting women be gorgeous idiots 
and men perma-adolescent clods. 

The 1970s may have begun 
with 1971's Carnal Knowledge — a 
bitter goodbye to the fucked-up- 
edness of pre-Sexual Revolution life 

— but the '80s began with 1982's 
Porky's , which signaled a return 
to sex as dirty joke when it wasn't 
harrowing in a vagina-dentata 
way (see: 1987's Fatal Attraction). 
The apex and nadir of anything- 
goes Me Decade public sexual 
expression was the existence of 
A1 Goldstein's zine Screw, which 
pushed the frontiers of the new 
permissiveness while indulging 
infantile humor and fearful-hos¬ 
tile misogyny. 

The most puerile if also most 
harmless expression of this was in 
comedic porn movies, which set a 
juvenile Borscht Belt tenor early on 
with Deep Throat (1972) and seldom 
aimed any higher thereafter. This 
ka-boom-cha! humor dominated the 
never-ending cycle of movie spoofs 
that probably started with 1970 soft¬ 
core jungle send-up Trader Hornee, 
but they also spawned a short-lived 
subgenre that ever-adventurous Joel 
Shepard of Yerba Buena Center for 
the Arts is celebrating with a retro¬ 
spective this month. Reviving three 
features from our nation's bicenten¬ 
nial year of 1976, "Honk If You're 
Horny: Retro Sex Musicals" definite¬ 
ly proves that if you were born too 
late for that era, you missed some 
very, very strange experiences. 

Where today's trend toward 
"darker" versions of fairy tales on 
the big and small screen — Grimm, 
all those Snow Whites, the upcom¬ 
ing Hansel and Gretel Witch Hunters 

— perhaps indicates how childish 
adult tastes have grown, in the 
Seventies those fables were used 
and abused to measure just how 
far from innocence we'd come. As 
early as 1963, no less than Herschell 
Gordon Lewis was presiding over 
"nudie-cutie" Goldilocks and the 
Three Bares, after which followed The 
Long Swift Sword of Siegfried (1971), 
the same year's The Erotic Adventures 
ofPinocchio ("It's Not His Nose That 
Grows!"), and so forth. But the 


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DIRTY 

JOKES 

‘Honk If You’re Horny’ 
brings retro porn to YBCA 




zenith, 

such as it is, of this trend 
was YBCA series kickoff Alice in 
Wonderland: An X-Rated Musical 
Fantasy (1976), whose opening 
credits feature the unique attribu¬ 
tion "Underwater Nude Volleyball 
sequences shot by..." 

In director Bud Townsend and 
scenarist-composer Bucky Searles' 
very free adaptation of Lewis 
Carroll, Alice (Playboy centerfold 
and future Jackie Chan co-star 
Kristine DeBell, making her film 
debut) is a repressed librarian 
led down a rabbit hole of sexual 
exploration and liberation. Before 
returning to the real world (and 
real delivery-guy cock), she's given 
a tongue bath by creatures whose 
costumes anticipate furry fan¬ 
dom; enjoys good vibrations from 
a talking rock; fellates the Mad 
Hatter; and watches unisex couple 
Tweedledee and Tweedledum 69 
each other (what else are they 
going to do?) One doesn't remem¬ 
ber stripping lesbian nurses in the 
original, or topless slo-mo horse¬ 
back riding. The women dance like 
Vegas showgirls and the men seem 
kinda queeny; don't even ask about 
the "songs." Nonetheless this cheap 
cheesefest was picked up for release 
by 20th Century Fox, which cut it 
to an R and made a small mint. 

Ergo it is perhaps not that sur¬ 


prising that YBCA's second feature, 
1976's The First Nudie Musical, got 
its own mainstream release from 
Paramount, tacky and horribly 
dated as it is. Made just before star 
Cindy Williams began Laverne and 
Shirley (though after she'd appeared 
in 1973's American Graffiti and on 
Happy Days with Ron Howard, who 
does a cameo here), this wheezing 
yokfest has her as secretary to a 
porn producer (Stephen Nathan). 
It's his big idea to counter flagging 
box office by shooting a porno 
musical, though that effort is 
nearly derailed by his being 
forced to put a studio boss' idiot 
son (writer and co-director Bruce 
Kimmel) behind the camera. 

The kind of unfunny that for 97 
minutes may make you want to 
kill yourself, Nudie duly has some 
full-frontal shots and a not-bad 
dancing dildos number. Otherwise 
— oy. 

Last and possibly least even in 
this context is 1976's Let My Puppets 
Come, one of those films that must 
be witnessed just to confirm that 
it exists — no matter how much 
you may regret doing so afterward. 
Late Bronx-bred Deep Throat auteur 
Gerard Damiano made some of the 
era's most famous and most interest¬ 
ing porn features (usually not the 
same ones), but here he indulged a 
self-parodic whim by satirizing his 
own crazy career in singing, danc¬ 
ing, fucking felt ersatz-Muppet form. 

Puppets' protagonists are a 
group of schmoes indebted to the 
mob and forced to make a porno to 
pay it off. (In the 2005 documen¬ 
tary Inside Deep Throat, the director 
alluded to his erstwhile mob bene- 
factors-bosses while his still-fearful 
wife keeps vehemently trying to 
shush him in the background.) 
Their resulting masterpiece stars 
the likes of "Anthony Quimm" 
and "Clitorus Leachman," features 
a bit of make-believe bestiality (a 
none-too-subtle reference to Throat 
star Linda Lovelace's canine thrill 
reel), has fake commercials (vaginal 
deodorant, etc.), and a cameo by A1 
Goldstein himself. 

Evidently Damiano's backers 
didn't appreciate the joke, since the 
film was released at just 40-odd 
minutes' length, with most of its 
songs cut. But Shepard promises 
an ultra-rare screening of the full, 
intended hour-and-a quarter edit. 
Swallow at your own risk, sfbg 

“HONK IF YOU’RE HORNY: RETRO SEX MUSICALS” 

Thu/6, Dec. 13, and 20, 7:30pm, $8-$10 
Yerba Buena Center for the Arts 
701 Mission, SF 
www.ybca.org 


RECORD COMPANT 


NEIL CAMPBELL & 
ROBERT NORTON 


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ARTS + CULTURE: MUSIC 


THERE ARE A FEW ORGANIC CONNECTIONS BETWEEN 
WOODEN SHJIPS (TOP) AND BARN OWL. 



BY EMILY SAVAGE 

emilysavage@sfbg.com 

TOFU AND WHISKEY Arbiter of good taste, Thrill 
Jockey Records is officially 20 years old. In anoth¬ 
er era, in another business, this would merely be a 
back-slapping milestone. In the present stuck-barrel- 
ing-downwards roller coaster of the music industry, 
it's an anniversary worthy of widespread jubilation. 

"It's a mind-boggling number of years," label 
founder Bettina Richards says during a phone call 
from the main office in Chicago, where the label's 
been based since 1995. 

And how else would a record label celebrates 
its birthday than with a series of familial con¬ 
certs? There have been shows booked in key 
Thrill Jockey cities such as New York (where 
it began in '92), London, San Francisco, LA, 
Chicago. Those shows (some of which have 
already gone down) boast lineups packed with 
label notables Tortoise, the Sea and Cake, Trans 
Am, Liturgy, Future Islands, and Matmos. 

The San Francisco version of the traveling 
Thrill Jockey rodeo will be headlined by the 
label's Bay Area acts: psych-rockers Wooden 
Shjips and drone duo Barn Owl, along with 
Liturgy, Trans Am, Man Forever, and Eternal 
Tapestry (Dec. 13, 8pm, $18. Independent, 628 
Divisadero, SF; www.theindependentsf.com). 

SF is considered a key Thrill Jockey city for a 
handful of reasons; there's the aforementioned 
connection with Wooden Shjips and Barn Owl, 
plus, one of the label's earliest releases was a band 
from here called A Minor Forest. And there's anoth¬ 
er super-secret new signing set for 2013 (sorry, you 
won't learn more than that here). "We've had a 
long, fond affection for the way San Franciscans 
can create super individual sounds," Richards says. 

Though they create different styles of music, 
Wooden Shjips and Barn Owl had some similari¬ 
ties that stood out to Richards when she was in 
the process of signing each. "They both share this 
transportive quality...taking you to an entirely 
different realm. With the Wooden Shjips, it's an 
active feeling of motion, and with Barn Owl, it's 
really an escape. It's hard to put into words, but 
they both do something compelling to me." 

It's that compulsion that's lead Richards to 
many of her choices for the roster. She tells this 
story about one one the label's most beloved acts: 
"Trans Am, way back in 1993, were the B-side of a 
seven-inch that John McEntire from Tortoise had 
recorded, and he gave me the seven-inch. It just 
happened that a week later they were playing. I 
saw them and was like, 'oh my god, I love them.'" 

While most of the acts have been found 
through musician friends and pals of the label, 
there's the occasional random encounter, like Sidi 
Toure, the gifted Malian singer-songwriter. His 
CD arrived via snail-mail to the Chicago office 
right before Christmas last year. "We don't usu¬ 
ally get packages from Mali. I was on a drive to 
go see my folks, popped it in, and I just couldn't 
believe it." I tell Richards I had the same initial 
reaction to Toure's mesmerizing compositions. 
"And the weirder thing," she adds, "was that he 
sent it because he's a really big Radian fan, which 
is a band from Austria with like, atonal drums. 
You just wouldn't have guessed that, right?" 

Austrian prog band HP Zinker was the first 
band she ever signed — at the time ('92), she was 


living New York City and was still bartending and 
working at a record shop. In fact, she did that for 
the first eight years of the label. The band lived 
in a decaying squat where White Zombie used 
to reside, and they all ended up moving in to 
Richards' studio apartment. Richards lets out a 
raucous laugh recalling those early days. 

From signing HP Zinker, to the label's 330th 
release planned for next year, Thrill Jockey has 
maintained a comparatively sparkling reputation 
as a label that treats its artists well. 

I asked Wooden Shjips drummer Omar 
Ahsanuddin why the label is so beloved and he 
replied: "Because they know their shit, are music 
fans, and mostly because [Richards] is a straight- 
shooter. As Phil Manley once told me: if you like 
getting paid on time, you'll like Thrill Jockey." 

Barn Owl's Jon Porras said, "It's great to work 
with a label that trusts an artistic vision...Thrill 
Jockey upholds a level of professionalism and is 
open to unconventional ideas." 

"I think one of the main things, at least to me, 
is that these bands would be doing what they're 
doing whether anybody is paying attention or 
not," says Richards. "This is something they're 
compelled to do. And in the same sense, we're com¬ 
pelled to put it out, whether it makes sense or not." 

And that's important in this current musical 
climate, a time when the mainstream labels are 
floundering, record sales have plummeted, and 
free music is a click away. "Trying to combat it 
would be like trying to swim against the tide. 


You'd exhaust yourself and get nowhere. Instead, 
we just try to adapt," Richards says. "We're small, 
so we're flexible and can adapt quickly. The 
people that work here are super music geeks, that 
keeps them really involved." 

One shift has been the number of releases 
it puts out. It jumped a few years back from 10 
releases a year, to three or four a month, includ¬ 
ing small print, specific collector releases, which 
appeal to the super music geek market. 

In a nostalgic mood, given the anniversary 
shows, I ask Richards to look back and pick out 
what she'd want her legacy to be, after this thrill 
ride is over: "I hope people are as attached to 
some of the bands and the records that I am. I 
hope to, as an octogenarian, sit in my house and 
blast a Barn Owl record and really feel the same 
feeling I felt the first time I heard it. And I hope 
it's as treasured to them as it is to us." 

Warm, fuzzy feelings abound. 

REED FLUTE THERAPY 

In these stressful last days of the year, we likely all 
need a modicum of relaxation, just a taste. Local 
reed flute master Eliyahu Sills, best known as part 
of the the Qadim Ensemble, has just released an 
acoustic solo tribute to the sacred music of Sufism; a 
haunting record meant to assist in meditation, yoga, 
and just some overall relaxation techniques. Song 
of the Reeds is 10 songs of original improvisations, 
created on a flute made from a reed; can't get more 
organic than that, www.qadimmusic.com. 

THE BABIES 

That Vivian Girls-Woods collaboration just keeps 
getting cuter. It's fascinating how it really feels 
split between the two out-fronts: Cassie Ramone 
and Kevin Morby, one part jingly lo-fi girl-group, 
one part folky, acoustic forest-dweller. With all 
the fuzz and tender melodies on half of the songs, 
it gets inevitable comparisons to Best Coast, but 
that's only a shade of its output. Check the new 
karaoke-filled, warped VHS-style video for "Baby," 
off Our House on the Hill , released this month on 
Woodsist, then go back and try alternating tracks 
such as "On My Time" or "Get Lost." It makes 
for an engrossing, push me/pull you dynamic 
that will translate nicely to the stage. Plus, the 
Brooklyn band plays with our own headlining 
post-punk heroes, Grass Widow. 

Thu/6, 9pm, $12 

Bottom of the Hill, 1233 17 St., SF. 
www.bottomofthehill.com 

ANTIBALAS 

Another Brooklyn export: infectious 11-piece 
Afrobeat band Antibalas is coming our way, with 
its first full-length album in five years — a self- 
titled LP released in August on Daptone Records 
— horns blazing. The long-running act has been 
making a big, boisterous noise since the late 
'90s, and closely followed in Fela Kuti's steps, yet 
has suffered in relative obscurity until recently. 
Earlier this year, the New York Times asserted its 
belief that a post -Fela! world (i.e. the rise of cross¬ 
over acts like Vampire Weekend, and the wildly 
popular run of Fela! on Broadway), might finally 
"catch up" and catch on to the skill of Antibalas. 
With Afrolicious DJs Pleasuremaker and Senor Oz. 
Mon/10, 8pm, $23 

Great American Music Hall, 859 O’Farrell, SF. 
www.slimspresents.com sfbg 


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ARTS + CULTURE: DANCE 


SING THE BODY 


‘Clas/sick Hip Hop’ 
performers defy gravity, 
inspire awe 



BY RITA FELCIANO 

arts@sfbg.com 


GETTING AHEAD: 
ANA “ROKAFELLA” 
GARCIA 

PHOTO BY YU WADEE 


DANCE Marc Bamuthi Joseph, Yerba Buena Center for the 
Arts' new Director of Performing Arts, received thunder¬ 
ous applause even before he had said a welcoming word 
to the capacity crowd in the venue's lobby. Such is this 
exceptional artist's charisma. When he told them that 
he wanted YBCA to become accessible to people who in 
the past may not have felt welcome there, they roared. It 
was to be that kind of evening. 

For "Clas/sick Hip Hop," Bamuthi's first program 
in his new position, he drew on what he knows so well 
— not just hip-hop as dance, but as a culture that has 
spread around the globe. Still an essentially urban genre, 
it started as a popular expression that is moving from 
the community into the concert hall. It's how dance 
genres have always evolved, from India to Egypt to 
France. For the time being, hip-hop seems to thrive in 
both places. 

While San Francisco's yearly International Hip Hop 
DanceFest has a rich tradition of presenting theatrical¬ 
ized versions, Bamuthi went back to the origins of the 
art as an essentially social practice. He structured "Clas/ 
sick" in two parts: the first half as a dance party with 
guest artists freestyling, the second half based on more 
formalized "battles" between individual practitioners. 

If anybody still needs convincing of hip-hop's 
potential as an expressive dance language, "Clas/sick" 
made as good a point as one could wish for. This sex¬ 
tet of bravura 
performers 
mesmerized 
without the¬ 
atrical accou¬ 
trements, just 
working with 
music, a torso, 
and four limbs. 

They seemed to 
ignore physical 
restrictions such 
as gravity, balance, 
time, or verticality. 

No ballerina can slither 

in her toe shoes as they did in their sneakers. And who 
has ever of supporting turns on an ankle? While many 
of the moves — head spins, backspins, windmills, 
popping and locking — looked familiar, these soloists 
rethought the basic vocabulary and made them their 
own. 

Levi Allen (a.k.a. I Dummy), the 19-year-old obvi¬ 
ously joint-less virtuoso from Oakland, does something 
he calls "Turf," while Marquesa "NonStop" Scott, who 
manipulates time from super slow and superfast, has ere 
ated a "Dupstep." Arthur "Lit Crabe" Cadre turns him¬ 
self into pretzels while hopping on one hand. I was pre¬ 
viously unaware of what "Memphis Jookin" is — but it 
was clear that Ladia Yate's platform shoes were a health 
risk even just standing, let alone dancing in them. 
(Sensibly she later safeguarded her feet in sneakers.) 

As for Ana "Rokafella" Garcia, she magnificently 
overcame gravitational pull by shooting horizon¬ 
tally along the floor only to rock up as smoothly 
as a tree righting itself. 


But none of these physically virtuosic performers 
approached the depth of Rennie Harris, who some 20 
years ago started the move towards developing choreo¬ 
graphic structures that make hip-hop more than an 
expression of individuality. He no longer pops and locks 
as he used to, but he remains enthralling, with split- 
second mood shifts from rage to vulnerability, aggres¬ 
sion to pride, and fatigue to full power ahead. Harris' 
performance impressed the sense of a human being as 
complex and indomitable. 

In the first half the audience danced lustily — so 
much fun to watch — to DJ Elan Vytal's spinning, while 
the professionals brought in their own tracks. For the 
battles, Matthew Szemela took his fiddle to places where 
I didn't know it could go. It's not clear whether these 
hip-hop performers had ever faced each other, but here 
they had to step beyond themselves and relate to a part¬ 
ner. They approached each other wearily much as they 
might on a street or a boxing arena, throwing out chal¬ 
lenges and invitations, finally coming to an understand¬ 
ing (or not). Scott and Allen's sliding and toe moves 
were reminiscent of ice skating, while Cadre's duet with 
Garcia came as close to a courting encounter as you are 
likely to find in hip-hop. 

It remains to be seen where Bamuthi intends to take 
the performing arts at YBCA. One 
thing is clear: he recognizes 
excellence when he sees it. 

He also throws a helluva 
a good party, sfbg 


26 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 


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ARTS + CULTURE: THEATER 


m 

z 

h 


LONDON DIARY 

Cruisingtotheend of story, and Forced Entertainment’s The Coming Storm’ 



FROM TOP: THE 
COMING STORM; 
SIGHT IS THE 


SENSE THAT DYING 
PEOPLE TEND TO 
LOSE FIRST. 


BY ROBERT AVILA 

arts@sfbg.com 

THEATER Tom Cruise, clad in mili¬ 
tary drag, descended last week by 
RAF helicopter into Trafalgar 
Square in what is best described as 
forced entertainment but was in 
fact a time-wasting scene from his 
upcoming blockbuster All You Need 
Is Kill. Not quite simultaneously 
but with considerably more stealth, 

I advanced into South London's 
Battersea area, in a completely unco¬ 
ordinated foray, to see the latest 
from famed Sheffield-based porno 
theater artists Forced Entertainment. 

Battersea Arts Centre, a bright red 
and white 1893 former town hall, is 
midway through a restoration process 
called "playgrounding" (putting art¬ 
ists and audiences at the center of the 
architectural redesign), and its many 
arches, rococo balustrades, and mosa¬ 
ic tile floors thrive amid an attractive 
combination of new paint and weath¬ 
ered surfaces. The place is an enviable 
model for an arts organization: a 
warm and bustling hub of commu¬ 
nity activity that is also a serious arts 
incubator and presenter, boasting 72 
performance-tested spaces and a live- 
in residency program geared to the 
truly experimental and exceptional. 

A nice place for Forced 
Entertainment to land, enthused 
artistic director Tim Etchells in a 
short interview before the evening's 
program. He said FE was in fact 
lucky to find itself there, space in 
London being at a premium. This 
is apparently true for even so inter¬ 
nationally successful and storied a 
group as Forced Entertainment. 

And speaking of stories, audi¬ 
ences would be up to their ears and 
eyes in them that night — or rather 
the loose ends of stories, volleys, 
and nose-dives from a meta-narra- 
tive barrage that manifested itself 
across a series of readings, perfor¬ 
mances, and neon. The sign aglow 
in the Cafe Bar, where I spoke with 
Etchells, said simply, "end of story." 
Another one said, "Shouting Your 
Demands from the Rooftop Should 
Be Considered a Last Resort." 

(All the variously colored neon 
phrases spread throughout the foyer 
and adjoining bar were by Etchells, 
whose many projects outside FE 
include visual art and writing. The 
evening kicked off with a book 
launch of his Vacuum Days, a large 


hospital-green compendium of daily 
headlines and announcements — the 
result of a 2011 internet-based proj¬ 
ect in which Etchells riffed on the 
news of the moment in dada-esque 
fashion. Flipping through the pages 
was an instant reminder of two 
things: it had been a hell of a year, 
and headlines are always loaded.) 

The centerpiece of the evening 
was The Coming Storm. Forced 
Entertainment's latest piece (in an 
unbroken line of group-devised 
work going back to the company's 
founding in 1984) begins unassum¬ 
ingly, with the six performers in 
their street clothes lined up onstage 
facing the audience. One of them 
holds a microphone, and begins by 
slowly articulating the necessary 
ingredients of a "good story." Soon 
the other performers grow visibly 
dubious and restless, until one 
snatches the microphone away and 
weighs in with a whopper of a tale, 
never completed, because also inter¬ 
rupted by another greedy storyteller. 

And so on through aggressive, 
sly, and puerile mic-swipings and 
gradual, unexpected permutations 
— as those without the microphone 
do any manner of things to cre¬ 
ate their own counter-narratives or 
merely sabotage the one dominating 
at the moment. It's a confluence of 
fractured accounts arranged like a 
20-car pile-up, or a game of keep 
away, or a gentle dance of despair, 
with occasional live score, random 
costume changes, and a cluster of 
branches embraced (and debunked) 
as a soothing shelter of forest. 

The Coming Storm ends up an 


exercise in failure and resilience at 
once, since even if no one completes 
a tale, the audience rushes to fill the 
void —our minds trained to shape 
every squiggle into a recognizable 
human form, however personal or 
outlandish the starting point. In 
that rowdy mutual tangle comes 
quiet reflection from the interstices 
of language and history. 

It left one in just the right frame 
of mind to receive the last perfor¬ 
mance of the night, Sight Is the Sense 
that Dying People Tend to Lose First, 
Etchells' monologue for New York 
actor Jim Fletcher (lately of the title 
role in Elevator Repair Service's 
acclaimed production, Gatz). 

Sight proved no return to nar¬ 
rative but rather a concatenation 
of eccentric observations and pro¬ 
nouncements, undertaken by a 
nameless po-faced character stand¬ 
ing center stage and meeting the 
audience's gaze in a free-associative 
unburdening of "meaning," desul¬ 
tory definitions that went along the 
lines of "Socks are gloves for the feet. 
Snow is cold. Water is the same thing 
as ice. In America things are bigger. 
America is a country. Korea is also 
a country." Then, some time later, 
"Cats are afraid of dogs. Dogs like to 
chase cats. Some dogs like to bite the 
tire of a passing car." Throughout this 
eccentric cataloguing and its naive 
reverie, the audience again acts to 
complete the work wordlessly. Subtle 
suggestions come, vistas briefly open, 
demurring exceptions and musings 
flicker by, as the audience is tossed 
one wry bone after another, and a 
slow vague pathos accumulates, sfbg 



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THEATRE RHINOCEROS PRESENTS 


SPONSORED BY 
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ARTS + CULTURE: FILM 


FROM TOP: HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, THE SUITOR, 
AND LE GRAND AMOUR. 


LE GRAND CAREER 

A delightful series shines a new spotlight on French comedian Pierre Etaix 


BY DENNIS HARVEY 

arts@sfbg.com 

FILM In the 1950s and '60s silent com¬ 
edy — which had hitherto seemed 
as extinct and useless as the dodo 
— experienced a popular revival, 
sparked by a Walter Kerr article in Life 
magazine and sustained by television 
broadcasts, compilation documentaries, 
the general rise of a cineaste culture, and 
the still-breathing status of a few old favorites. 

(Buster Keaton, for one, spent a very busy last 15 
years making guest appearances on both the 
big and small screen.) That nostalgic inter¬ 
est didn't greatly effect new Hollywood 
movies of the era, however, apart from a 
brief vogue for bloated homages like It's 
a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963), The 
Great Race (1965), and Those Magnificent 
Men in Their Flying Machines (1965), 
exercises in slapstick elephantiasis that 
placed mistaken belief in the notion that 
bigger is always better. 

In France, by contrast, at least a couple 
notable careers emerged devoted to honor¬ 
ing and elaborating on the tropes of silent 
comedy. The obvious one belonged to 
Jacques Tati, whose elegant orchestra¬ 
tion of the clash between progress and 
fallible humanity made the modern 
world its subject while pretty much 
dispensing with sound (or at least dia¬ 
logue) cinema altogether. 

But Tati also had a protege of sorts, 

Pierre Etaix, who had his own similar yet 
distinct run of films that made compara¬ 
tively little impact outside France. If they're 
almost entirely unknown to us today, that's in large 
part because legal complications kept them unavailable 
for many long years. It's only recently that they've been 
restored and re-released, reaching the US in a traveling 
retrospective that lands at the Christopher B. Smith Rafael 
Film Center this weekend and next. "Pierre Etaix: Lost and 
Found'' is well worth crossing the bridge for — the five 
features and three shorts it encompasses represent a decade 
of work for the most part so delightful it seems downright 
perverse we're just now making their acquaintance. 

Smitten by circus clowning at an early age but also 
developing considerable skills as a musician and designer, 
Etaix began a stage career in his late teens. But it was 
his talent as an illustrator that caught the eye of Tati, for 
whom he became an assistant during the four years of 
preproduction on the writer-director-actor's third feature 
Mon Oncle (1958). After that Etaix returned to live perfor¬ 
mance with considerable success, his comedy act at one 
point opening for quintessential Gallic pop idol Johnny 
Halladay. It was suggested he try making short films, and 
the elaborate second such effort, Happy Anniversary, wound 
up winning the 1963 Oscar for Best Live Action Short. 

Still, his producer was reluctant to commit to a 
feature, so Etaix and his writing partner Jean-Claude 
Carriere wrote a script episodic enough that it could be 
released as several separate shorts if necessary. The Suitor 



9 



(1962) put the star's flexible prior character 
— an approximate cross between Keaton, 
Harold Lloyd, and Steve Carrell — into a 
series of awkward courtships in response 
to his exasperated parents' concern 
that he will never marry. (The funniest 
involves his wrangling an extremely 
drunk woman home from a nightclub.) 
It was a success, prompting the much 
more ambitious Yo Yo (1965), an absurdist 
microcosm of 20th century history with his 
titular protagonist reeling from Roaring Twenties 
to World War II to the gray flannel suit corporate 
era. The next year's As Long as You're Healthy 
retrenched a bit — it really was three 
separate shorts strung together (a fifth 
was rather inexplicably cut and released 
separately as Feeling Good). Three were 
amusing; the fourth, involving a farmer, 
a hunter, and two picnickers creating 
havoc for each other on a rural day out, is 
a masterpiece of slapstick intricacy. 

After a circus tour, he made his first 
color feature, 1969's Le Grand Amour. It 
had just a wisp of plot (involving the specter 
of infidelity threatening hero Pierre's mar¬ 
riage to Florence, played by Etaix's actual 
spouse Annie Fratellini), but a surfeit 
of exquisitely realized gags including 
a marvelous, surreal dream sequence 
with locomotive beds. 

But then he made an apparently fatal 
mistake: taking an interesting gamble on 
1971's Land of Milk and Honey, a caustic 
^ documentary (and, to an extent, parody of 
documentaries) that starts out as deliberate¬ 
ly cliched ode to La France then rapidly turns 
into a prolonged sneer at its citizens. Dwelling on 
talentless would-be singers in some Gong Show-like forum 
and ordinary, unattractive bodies on full display at the 
beach, no more impressed by the hippies than the bour- 
geoise, its portrait of a vapidly complacent populace struck a 
nerve when the 1969-shot film was finally released in 1971. 
It was the wrong nerve — the movie was loathed, and feels 
mean-spirited even today. Still, it hardly should have ended 
Etaix's entire screen career as star and director. 

Somehow it did, though, more or less. Etaix found 
financing for just one more feature of his own (1987's 
autumnal Monsieur is Getting Older, not in the Rafael series), 
otherwise occupying himself with more stage work and TV. 
He also acted for an interesting mix of directors including 
Nagisa Oshima, Philip Kaufman, Otar Iosseliani, Jean-Pierre 
Jeunet, and Aki Kaurismaki — in addition to having earlier 
worked with Robert Bresson, Louis Malle, and (in the noto¬ 
rious, unreleased The Day the Clown Cried) Jerry Lewis. Now 
in his mid-80s, he's stuck around long enough to enjoy his 
prime work being rediscovered and celebrated for its some¬ 
times hilarious, often near-balletic ingenuity, sfbg 

“PIERRE ETAIX: LOST AND FOUND” 

Dec. 7-13, $10.50 

Christopher B. Smith Rafael Film Center 
1118 Fourth St., San Rafael 
www.cafilm.org 



28 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 

I EDITORIALS j 

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ARTS + CULTURE: FILM 


IN THE FAMILY’S CHIP (SEBASTIAN BRODZIAK) AND JOEY (PATRICK WANG) 

PHOTO COURTESY IN THEFAMILYLLC 



Make time for sensitive indie drama ‘In the Family’ 


BY CHERYL EDDY 

cheryl@sfbg.com 

FILM With a running time of just under three 
hours, writer-director-star Patrick Wang's In 
the Family rewards patient viewers with its 
quietly observed tale of a man battling for 
custody of his son. 

Wang's debut feature has already earned 
local acclaim, picking up both the Best 
Narrative Feature Award and the Emerging 
Filmmaker Award at the 2012 San Francisco 
International Asian American Film Festival. 

It returns in an expanded engagement right 
When Hollywood is rolling out its flashiest 
year-end fare, which In the Family neither 
resembles nor aspires to resemble; its story 
unfolds via remarkably low-key scenes, most 
of which are shot using extremely long sin¬ 
gle takes. Not many films, even self-produced 
indie dramas, dare allow so much breathing 
room into each sequence. 

This technique works, for the most 
part, because the story is so compelling. 

Joey (Wang) and Cody (Trevor St. John) 
are a well-matched couple in small-town 
Tennessee, busy with jobs —Joey's a contrac¬ 
tor; Cody's a teacher — and raising six-year- 
old Chip (Sebastian Brodziak, who delivers a 
natural performance that's thankfully more 
precocious than precious). Their home life is 
relaxed and routine, focused on their lively, 
dragon-obsessed boy. In the Family takes its 


time revealing their relationship's origins, 
with flashbacks so briskly edited they stand 
out in contrast to the film's otherwise unhur¬ 
ried pace. Chip's mother, it turns out, is 
Cody's late wife; some time after her death, 
it's Cody who initiates a romance with the 
laconic, truck-driving guy who's been help¬ 
ing renovate his house. 

But even before we learn this, tragedy 
strikes: a car accident gravely injures Cody. 
The first sign of In the Family's looming 
drama occurs at the hospital, where Cody's 
sister Eileen (Kelly Me Andrew), brother- 


in-law Dave (Peter Hermann), and mother 
Sally (Park Overall) have gathered. When a 
nurse insists that "only family members are 
allowed to visit," nobody stands up for Joey. 
When Cody dies, grief washes over every¬ 
one. Tempers flare when it's revealed that 
Cody's will is six years old, written before 
his relationship with Joey. When they were 
together, Joey admits, "We didn't talk about 
the big stuff" — and the legal consequences 
are devastating. Guardianship of Chip, it 
seems, goes to Eileen. 

"Nothing makes sense," Cody weeps to 


Joey during a flashback that takes place right 
after his wife's death. It's a sentiment Joey 
fully understands, but Wang avoids scenes 
of tear-stained arguments or other typical 
melodrama cliches to convey the depths of 
his character's despair. A particularly moving 
flashback recalls the night the two first kissed 
after bonding over Chip Taylor tunes (the 
songwriter cameos in the film, and his melan¬ 
choly music is a recurring motif). In the next 
scene, set in the film's present, Joey is wearing 
the same striped shirt Cody had on that night. 

In the Family's biggest contrivance is con¬ 
taining most of its last act in a deposition 
scene, complete with a cartoonishly slick 
lawyer whose cruel questions make sure the 
viewer knows that homophobia (and racism) 
are both themes here. Joey's response is a 
lengthy monologue loaded with exposition 
(and probably more words than the rest of 
the script's pages, combined). It's a bottom- 
heavy ending to a film that otherwise prefers 
observing at a distance — shooting Joey 
from behind rather than showing his face 
when he learns that Cody has died; allow¬ 
ing important action to occur off screen 
or behind closed doors; and using its long, 
wordless scenes to convey delicate, organical¬ 
ly-shifting emotions. It's a "message movie" 
that prefers subtlety over speechifying, and 
is all the more powerful for it. sfbg 

IN THE FAMILY opens Fri/7 in San Francisco. 


MUSIC G ARTS FEST • NYE WEEKEND • SAN FRANCISCO, CA 



eyeheartsf presents 




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with MIXMASTER MIKE 

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EDITORIALS! NEWS i FOOD + DRINK ! PICKS 


MUSIC LISTINGS i STAGE LISTINGS ! ON THE CHEAP ! FILM LISTINGS I CLASSIFIEDS 


DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 / SFBG.COM 29 


ARTS + CULTURE 


























MUSIC LISTINGS 


LAVENDER DIAMOND PLAYS 
THE CHAPEL TUE/11. 



Music listings are compiled by Emily Savage. 
Since club life is unpredictable, it’s a good 
idea to call ahead orcheckthevenue’sweb- 
site to confirm bookings and hours. Prices 
are listed when provided to us. Visit www. 
sfbg.com/venue-guide for venue information. 
Submit itemsforthe listings at listings@sfbg. 
com. Forfurther information on howto submit 
itemsforthe listings, see Picks. 

WEDNESDAY 5 

ROCK/BLUES/HIP-HOP 

Bob vs Charles Johnny Foley’s Dueling 
Pianos. 9pm, free. 

Curren$y, Paydin Cash, J. Price, Zyme, 

Eric Ryan Elliott, G. Maly DNA Lounge. 

9pm, $25, all ages. 

Gunshy Johnny Foley’s. 9pm, free. 

How To Dress Well, Beacon, Seatraffic 

Rickshaw Stop. 8pm, $12-$14. 

Keith Crossan Blues Showcase: Freddie 
Hughes Biscuitsand Blues. 8pm, $15. 

Lost Bayou Ramblers Chapel, 777Valencia, 
SF; www.thechapelsf.com. 9pm, $10-$12, 
all ages. 

Franco Nero, Tritonics, DJ Adam Elbo 
Room. 9pm, $7. 

Surplus 1980, Satya Sena, Electric Chair 
Repair Co. Bottom of the Hill. 9pm, $9. 

Trixie Whitley, Social Studies, Hosannas, 
Johnny Hwin x, Brodie Jenkins Brickand 
Mortar Music Hall. 8pm, $8-$10, 18 + . 
Communion in San Francisco. 

JAZZ/NEW MUSIC 

“Del Sol Days” Z Space, 450 Florida, SF; 
www.zspace.org. 4-6pm, 8-10pm. $10. 

Two open rehearsals with composers Dylan 
Mattingly, MattCmiel, Lembit Beecher, and 
Irene Sazer. 

Dink Dink Dink, Gaucho, Eric Garland’s 
Jazz Session Amnesia. 7pm, free. 

Ricardo Scales Top of the Mark, 999 
California, SF; www.topofthemark.com. 


6:30pm, $5. 

Tuck and Patti Yoshi’sSF. 8pm, $20. 

DANCE CLUBS 

Booty Call Q-Bar, 456 Castro, SF; www.boo- 
tycallwednesdays.com. 9pm. Juanita MORE! 
and Joshua J hostthis dance party. 

Coo-Yah! Slate Bar, 2925 16th St, SF; 
www.slate-sf.com. 10pm, free. With Vinyl 
Ambassador, DJ Silverback, DJsGreen Band 
Daneekah. 

Hardcore Humpday Happy Hour RKRL, 52 
Sixth St, SF; (415) 658-5506. 6pm, $3. 
Martini Lounge John Colins, 138 Minna, 

SF; www.johncolins.com. 7pm. With DJ Mark 
Divita. 

THURSDAY 6 


ROCK/BLUES/HIP-HOP. 

“Alice in Winterland” Bimbo’s. 8pm, $40. 
With Of Monsters and Men, Hedley, Andy 
Grammer. 

Charles vs Bob Johnny Foley’s Dueling 
Pianos. 9pm, free. 

Ezra Furman and His Band, City Tribe, 
Split Screens Brick and Mortar Music Hall. 
9pm, $7-$10, 18 + . 

“GLIDE’S Annual Holiday Jam” Warfield. 
7pm, $65-$125. With Eoin Harrington, Lara 
Johnson, POPLYFE, Judith Hill, Tony! Toni! 
Tone!, and more. 

Grass Widow, Babies, Scrapers Bottom of 
the Hill. 9pm, $12. 

John Lawton Trio Johnny Foley’s. 9pm, free. 
Candye Kane Biscuitsand Blues. 8and 
10pm, $20. 

Brian McKnight Yoshi’sSF. 8pm, $60; 
10pm, $50. 

Metro Mictlan, Suzuki Junzo, Numinous 

Eye HemlockTavern. 8:30pm, $6. 

Moe. Independent. 9pm, $30. 

Rock Bottom, Vanishing Breed, Casy and 
Brian Thee Parkside. 9pm, $5-$10. 

Streetlight Manifesto, Hostage Calm, 


Lionize Slim’s. 8pm, $18.50-$21. 
“Umloud” DNA Lounge. 7pm, $15, 18 + . 
Charity concert for Child’s Play Charity with 
27 bands. 

JAZZ/NEW MUSIC 

Break Up Record Release Party Lab, 2948 
16th St, SF; www.thelab.org. 9pm, $7-$10. 


With Never Knows, Head/Head, Bezier, Space 
Burn. 

“Del Sol Days” Z Space, 450 Florida, SF; 
www.zspace.org. 8pm, $15-$100 forgala 
reception. “Night” from GARDEN, a multi- 
media production by Del Sol. 

Stompy Jones Top of the Mark, 999 
California, SF; www.topofthemark.com. 


7:30pm, $10. 

Tuck and Patti Yoshi’sSF. 8pm, $20. 

FOLK/WORLD/COUNTRY 

El Gavachillo, DJ Senor Oz Elbo Room. 
9:30pm, $10. 

Twang! Honky Tonk Fiddler’sGreen, 1330 
Columbus, SF; www.twanghonkytonk.com. 
5pm. Live country music. 

Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats 

Connecticut Yankee. 9pm. 

DANCE CLUBS 

All 80s Thursday Cat Club. 9pm, $6 (free 
before 9:30pm). The best of ‘80s mainstream 
and underground. 

Base: Attack of the DJs Vessel, 85 Campton 
Place, SF; www.vesselsf.com. 10pm, $10. 
With Quinn Jerome, Lisa Rose, Alex Sibley, 
John Destiny. 

Bridge SF Public Works. 9pm, $15. With 
Guilty Simpson, House Shoes, Samiyam, 
Dibia$e, Knxwledge, Drewmin. 

Ritual Dubstep Temple. 10pm-3am, $5. 

Trap and bass. 

Supersonic Lookout, 3600 16th St., SF ; 
www.lookoutsf.com. 9pm. Global beats 
paired with food from around the world by 
Tasty. Resident DJs Jaybee, B-Haul, amd 
Diagnosis. 

Tropicana Madrone Art Bar. 9pm, free. 

Salsa, cumbia, reggaeton, and more with 
DJs Don Bustamante, Apocolypto, Sr. Saen, 
Santero, and Mr. E. 

FRIDAY 7 


ROCK/BLUES/HIP-HOP 

Elvin Bishop Biscuitsand Blues. 8pm, $39. 

Bob, Nathan Temby, Charles Johnny Foley’s 
Dueling Pianos. 9pm, free. 

Buttercream Gang, Surf Club, 
Horrorscopes Brick and Mortar Music Hall. 
9pm, $7-$10, 18 + . 





SflWs 

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in JIfkSX&IfiT in fruiting 


THURS MC.* ■ WWtS T.'SHOT 8 ■ S1S.W 4». f SIL K« 

STREETLIGHT MANIFESTO 

HOSTAGE CALM uphiic 

Fhi. DEE. 7 * 5MH U ■ SHOW 9 - m f£K. f £LI DOOR 

WORLD/INFERNO 
FRIENDSHIP SOCIETY 
O'DEATH 

MF.MC. E'PMflS/SHOWED ' 53 WY. t Wt im 

THE POLYPHONIC SPREE 
- HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA 

GUSTAFER YEUOWGOLD 

OIKKHANCV -UADSHFIHC f IRE 1 KMH4W 
IQSHIQ HIRJLHQ 1 DJ XGPVHETH L- KEMP 


rRUMl.HC.2UU 
MttS HSIHWa ■ jTJ ADV./$13 DOGS 

THE MOTHER HIPS 

nLBUT: JACKPOT - ERIK THE RED 


T*m. Mf L3 ■ SW*5 B ■■ 5HD* ^ - SL5 WV. / Si * WTO* 

PEG FORMER MACAZIHE PRESENTS 

PASSENGER 

KATCCARL 


F3H. MI. U' 7 i SHOW & * S19 W.UF PW 

THE AQUAEATS! 

SUBURBAN LEGENDS 

KEPI CHOU LIE 


1U ibr^il b[UI Cmml PjJfnLi»| - : ■ 5 m i j 1 Lil\: i ■ fiAU* i! AMIlXC Tl-. 

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FBI. DEC. 26 * DOOfS b t SHClYl 6J* m * L5 BUM HOif 

SEAN HE ALT PHISCNK 
WE ARE THE LAST MEN Oil EARTH 
LILY HOLBROOK * FEBRUARY ZERO 
CHEATING DAYLIGHT 

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ANTIBALAS 

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TK.4RTEI.HC.il IU.nLW.lSH. IBC.U.1S A IE 

m.tm mm 

HEnUCVUHIHI PIKEHK IK EVEN I IK HLTH 

CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD 


SFJAZZ 


WHERE LOCALS MEET LEGENDS 


jSFJAZZ Hotplate is a monthly concert 
, series featuring up-and-coming r —^ 
\ local artists re-imagining 
\ themusicof jaZZ icons./ 


DECEMBER 13 


Chris Dingman plays 

BOBBY HUTCHERSON 


\v_ 

HIM. ■ * 

Smith Dobson plays 

LESTER YOUNG 


SFJAZZ Center Grand Opening 
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day • Jan 21,2013! 


sfjazzhotplate.org 


2nd Thursday of every month 
Amnesia 853 Valencia Street 
DJ at 8pm Bands at 9pm $5 


sponsored by (f he * Examtner sfbgcom 


30 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 


EDITORIALS 


NEWS 


FOOD + DRINK 


PICKS 


ARTS + CULTURE 


MUSIC LISTINGS 


STAGE LISTINGS 


ON THE CHEAP j FILM LISTINGS | CLASSIFIEDS 



















































MUSIC LISTINGS 


Funkin’ Fridays with Swoop Unit Amnesia. 
6pm. 

Judgement Day, Young Hunter, La Fin Du 
Monde, Billions Upon Us Thee Parkside. 
9pm, $8. 

Moe. Independent. 9pm, $30. 

Night Genes, White Teeth, Youth of Today 

HemlockTavern. 9:30pm, $7. 

Ozomatli Fillmore. 9pm, $26.50. 

Top Secret Band Johnny Foley’s. 9pm, free. 
Turbo Fruits, White Lung, CCR 
Headcleaner Bottom of the Hill. 10pm, $12. 
“Usual Suspects Songwriter Showcase” 
Neck of the Woods, 406 Clement, SF; www. 
rock-it-room.com. 7pm, $5. 

Vhol, Lawless Elbo Room. 9:30pm, $12. 
“What the Dickens Two-Day Fundraiser for 
Carole Lennon” Lennon Rehearsal Studios, 
271 Dore, SF; lennonstudios.com/dickens. 
html. 4pm. With Lewd, No Alternative, 
Hemorage, Guverment, Next, D’Jelly Brains, 


FOR MORE MUSIC CONTENT VISIT 

SFBG.COM/NOISE ^ 

and more. 

World/Inferno Friendship Society, 

O’Death, Bobby Joe Ebola Slim’s. 9pm, 

$16. 

JAZZ/NEW MUSIC 

Audium 1616 Bush, SF; www.audium.org. 
8:30pm, $20. Theater of sound-sculptured 
space. 

Black Market Jazz Orchestra Top of the 

Mark, 999 California, SF; www.topofthemark. 
com. 9pm, $10. 

“Del Sol Days” Z Space, 450 Florida, SF; 
www.zspace.org. 8pm, $15-$30. Musicof 
Daniel Ward, Lembit Beecher, Gabriela Lena 
Frank, and more. 

Brian McKnight Yoshi’sSF. 8pm, $65; 

10pm, $60. 


FOLK/WORLD/COUNTRY 

Fat Opie BazaarCafe, 5927 California, SF; 
www.bazaarcafe.com. 8pm. 

Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats 

Plough and Stars. 9pm. 

DANCE CLUBS 

Destiny DNA Lounge. 10pm, $15, 18 + . With 
Sequence, Komander, Degai. 

Fredinho and Marlon Cellar, 685 Sutter, SF; 
Facebook: Underground Showcase. 10pm, 
$ 10 . 

Joe Lookout, 3600 16th St.,SF; www.look- 
outsf.com. 9pm. Eight rotating DJs, shirt-off 
drinkspecials. 

Old School JAMZ El Rio. 9pm. FruitStand 
DJsspinningold school funk, hip-hop, and 
R&B. 

Paris to Dakar Little Baobab, 3388 19th 


St, SF; (415) 643-3558. 10pm, $5. Afro 
and world music with rotating DJs includ¬ 
ing Stepwise, Steve, Claude, Santero, and 
Elembe. 

Popseka Vessel, 85 Campton Place, SF; 
www.vesselsf.com. 10pm, $20-$30. 

Marc Romboy PublicWorks. 9:30pm, $12- 
$ 20 . 

Twitch DNA Lounge. 9pm, $5-$8, 18 + . 
Hard and sparse dance beats with Kevin 
Sniecinski, Justin, Omar, and Rachel Aiello. 

SATURDAY 8 


ROCK/BLUES/HIP-HOP 

Bray Bottom of the Hill. 10pm, $15. 

Charles, Bob, Jason Marion Johnny Foley’s 
Dueling Pianos. 9pm, free. 

Dubsmashers, Katie Gribaldi, Aria Knight, 


Smash & Grab Biscuitsand Blues Union 
Room. 8pm, $15. Independent Distribution 
Collective Holiday Party. 

Fusion Johnny Foley’s. 9pm, free. 

Paula Harris Biscuits and Blues. 8 and 
10pm, $20. 

Hot Lunch, Buffalo Tooth Bender’s, 800 S. 
Van Ness, SF; www.bendersbar.com. 10pm, 
$5. 

Daria Shani Johnson Lucky Horseshoe, 453 
Cortland, SF; www.theluckyhorseshoebar. 
com. 8pm, free. 

“KC Turner’s 30th Birthday Bash” Swedish 
American Music Hall. 8pm, $18-$25. With 
Megan Slankard, Matt the Electrician, Steve 
Poltz. 

Lecherous Gaze, Owl, Wild Eyes Hemlock 
Tavern. 9:30pm, $7. 

Moe. Independent. 9pm, $30. 

CONTINUES ON PAGE 32 » 



2170 MARKET 
STREET 

415 . 861.5016 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 8TH 8PM $l8/$25 
(ROCK/POP) ALL AGES 

UPSTAIRS AT THE SWEDISH HALL: 
KC TURNER’S 30TH BIRTHDAY BASH 
FEATURING: 

MEGAN SLANKARD 

MATT THE ELECTRICIAN 
STEVE POLTZ 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 8TH 8:30PM $12 (SWING/STEAMPUNK) 
SWING GOTH PRESENTS: YOU’LL DANCE 4EVER 
- A BOOM SWING CABARET FEATURING: 

GOOD CO 

JSINJ (Dj) • SPARKLY DEVIL (BURLESQUE) 
DELACHAUX (Dj) 

DJ THE KLOWN * MC MZ.K 


SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 
DECEMBER 9TH, IOTH, NTH AND I2TH 7:30PM 
SI2-S20 SLIDING SCALE (ROCK/POP) 

BLUE BEAR SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
BAND SHOWCASES 


THURSDAY DECEMBER I3TH 9PM $I0/$I2 (INDIE) 
LOVING CUP PRESENTS: 

SAM CHASE AND THE 
FUNCTIONAL ALCOHOLICS 
THE SLEEPING GIANTS 


SATURDAY DECEMBER I5TH 8:30PM $10 (INDIE) 
LOVING CUP PRESENTS: 

FAMILY FOLK EXPLOSION 
ASH REITER 
FPODBPOD 


TUESDAY DECEMBER I8TH 8PM $25 (SINGER-SONGWRITER) 

KINKY FRIEDMAN’S BIPOLAR 
TOUR: A FACT FINDING MISSION 

WITH SPECIAL GUEST: 

BRIAN MOLNAR 


THURSDAY DECEMBER 20TH 7:30PM $7 (ROCK) 

POWDER 

THE BANG • RAIN PARADE 


FRIDAY DECEMBER 2IST 9:30PM $I2/$I5 (ROCK) 

THE FIRST CHURCH OF THE 
SACRED SILYERSEXUAL 
STRAIGHT-UPS 
COO COO BIRDS 

IESUS ANGEL GARCIA (FROM THREE TIMES BAD) 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 22ND 9PM $I2/$I5 (SWING/ROCKABILLY) 
A-TOWN AGENCY AND SLIM PRESENTS: 

VAGABOND LOVER’S CLUB WITH 
SLIM JENKINS 

29TH STREET SWINGTET 
BURLESQUE WITH SZANDORA LAVAY, 
ROXY REVE & BUNNY PISTOL 

_DJ TANOA “SAMOA BOY”_ 


WEDNESDAY L2/Q5 
3PM * $3 ADV ft DOOR 

- AwnaTeixeira 

■ Ths Adversary 

* Redwood Son 

THURSDAY 13/06 

9PM - f7 ADY ft *7-10 DOOR 

- SmaJI Town Therapy 

* Testers 

FRIDAY 13/07 

9FM ■ *LD ADV ft $L2 DOOR 

* David Wax Museum 

* ForlAUantlG 

* ThaShant* 

SATURDAY 13/08 
9PM -*13 ADV ft *15 DOOR 

* Brendan James 

* Brian Jarvis 

* Lara Johnston 

SUNDAY 13/09 
8PM - *10 ADY A- DOOR 
Art Evening with: 

* The 9 

Songwriter Series 

MONDAY 13/10 
3PM - IFREE 
Bay Guardian Readers 
Poll Best Open Mio 

* Open mlc with 

Brendan Getzell 

TUESDAY E3/11 
STM * *10 ADV & DOOR 

* Tyson Motsenbocker 

* MikcEdcl 

* Lowly Specs 

■ Sweethearts 


WEDNESDAY 1 
3PM * $10 ADV & DOOR 

* Justin Farren 

* Current Swell 

* Karmen Bottler 


THURSDAY 13/13 
9 PM ■ $6 ADV 4 DOOR 
PusswK?di Productions 
Presents; 

* Idea The Artist 

* Owl Paws 

* Sing Symphony 

* DonCat 


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% 


CONT> 


Ozomatli Fillmore. 9pm, $26.50. 

Planet Booty, Hottub DJs Brick and Mortar 
Music Hall. 9pm, $7-$10, 18 + . 

Polyphonic Spree Holiday Show Slim’s. 
6pm, $20. 

John Prine Warfield. 8pm, $39-$59. 

Slow Motion Cowboys Riptide. 9:30pm, 
free. 

Stevie Tombstone, Jimmy Nash, Uke Hunt 

Thee Parkside. 9pm, $8. 

“What the Dickens Two-Day Fundraiser for 
Carole Lennon” Lennon Rehearsal Studios, 
271 Dore, SF; lennonstudios.com/dickens. 
html. Noon. With Translator, John Shirley and 
the Screaming Geezers, Frightwig, Thrill of 
the Pull, and more. 


JAZZ/NEW MUSIC 

Audium 1616 Bush, SF; www.audium.org. 
8:30pm, $20. Theater of sound-sculptured 
space. 

“Del Sol Days” Z Space, 450 Florida, SF; 
www.zspace.org. 8pm, $15-$30. Music of 
Mason Bates, IreneSazer, Dylan Mattingly, 
and more. 

Brian McKnight Yoshi’sSF. 8pm, $70; 
10pm, $65. 

Will and Anthony Nunziata Rrazz Room. 
3pm, $40. 

“You’ll Dance 4Ever: Boom Swing 
Cabaret” Cafe Du Nord. 8:30pm, $12. 

FOLK/WORLD/COUNTRY 

Josh Eden and Rebecca Cross Red Poppy 
Art House. 8pm, $10-$15. 


DANCE CLUBS 

Bootie SF: Holiday Party DNA Lounge. 

9pm, $10-$15, 21 + . 

Braza! Slate Bar, 2925 16th St, SF; www. 
slate-sf.com. 10pm, $5. Brazilian dance 
party. 

Cockblock Rickshaw Stop. 10pm, $5-$10. 
Club Gossip CatClub. 9pm, free before 
9:30pm, $5-$8 after. With VJs Shon, Low 
Life, Damon, and more. 

EDX, Tech Minds Vessel, 85 Campton Place, 
SF; www.vesselsf.com. 10pm, $20-$30. 
Haceteria Public Works Oddjob Loft. 9pm, 
$5-$8. With Austin Cesear, Dusted Review, 
Loren Steele, Jason P, TristesTropiques, 
SMAC, Nihar. 

Kinky Disko Rebel, 1760 Market, SF; www. 
kinkydisko.com. 9pm, $5. With DJ Johnny 
Sonic, Allen Craig. 

Paris to Dakar Little Baobab, 3388 19th 


St, SF; (415) 643-3558. 10pm, $5. Afro and 
world music with rotating DJs. 

Tormenta Tropical Elbo Room. 10pm. With 
DJs Shawn Reynaldo, Oroll. 

2 Men Will Move You Amnesia. 9pm. 


SUNDAY 9 


ROCK/BLUES/HIP-HOP 

“Blue Bear School of Music Showcase” 

Cafe Du Nord. 7:30pm, $12-$20. 

Bob vs Charles Johnny Foley’s Dueling 
Pianos. 9pm, free. 

John Cale, Cass McCombs Regency 
Ballroom. 8pm, $32 and $48. 

Cumstain, Be Helds, Grandma’s Boyfriend 

HemlockTavern. 6pm, $5. 

Dying Fetus, Cattle Decapitation, Cerebral 
Bore, Fallujah, Logistic Slaughter, 


Inanimate Existence DNA Lounge. 7:30pm, 
$20, all ages. 

Llyod Gregory Biscuits and Blues. 7 and 
9pm, $15. 

John Lawton Trio Johnny Foley’s. 9pm, free. 

Kopecky Family Band, Yellow Dress Band 

Brickand Mortar Music Hall. 9pm, $7-$10,18 + . 

Meshell Ndegeocello: Tribute to Nina 
Simone, Con Brio Great American Music 
Hall. 8pm, $26. 

Psychotic Pineapple, Dukes of Hamburg, 
DJ Russell Quan Bottom of the Hill.8pm, 
$15. 

Walking Papers Independent. 8pm, $20. 

JAZZ/NEW MUSIC 

Dmitri Matheny Bliss Bar, 4026 24th St, SF ; 
www.blissbar.com. 4:30pm, $10. 

Brian McKnight Yoshi’sSF. 7pm, $55; 9pm, 
$50. 


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iL 


9:45pm, $12. 


DANCE CLUBS 

Beats for Brunch Thee Parkside. 11am, 
free. With Chef Josie and DJ Motion Potion. 
Dub Mission Elbo Room. 9pm, $6. Dub, 
roots, and classic dancehall with DJ Sep, 
Ludichris, and U9Lift. 

Jock Lookout, 3600 16th St, SF; www.look- 
outsf.com. 3pm, $2. 

MONDAY 10 


ROCK/BLUES/HIP-HOP 

Antibalas, Afrolicious, DJs Pleasuremaker 

and Oz Great American Music Hall. 8pm, 
$21-$23. 

“Blue Bear School of Music Showcase” 

Cafe Du Nord. 7:30pm, $12-$20. 

Damir Johnny Foley’s. 9pm, free. 


Dangermaker, Shape, FayRoy Bottom of the 
Hill. 9pm, $8. 

David Bazan Band plays Pedro the Lion’s 
‘Control’ Independent. 8pm, $17. 

FOLK/WORLD/COUNTRY 

Toshio Hirano Amnesia. 9pm, free. 

DANCE CLUBS 

Crazy Mondays Beauty Bar, 2299 Mission, 
SF; www.thebeautybar.com. 10pm, free. Hip- 
hop and otherstuff. 

Death Guild DNA Lounge. 9:30pm, $3-$5, 
18 + . Gothic, industrial, and synthpop with 
Joe Radio, Decay, and Melting Girl. 

M.O.M. Madrone Art Bar. 6pm, free. DJs 
Timoteo Gigante, Gordo Cabeza, and Chris 
Phlek playing all Motown every Monday. 

Soul Cafe John Colins Lounge, 138 Minna, 


SF; www.johncolins.com. 9pm. R&B, hip- 
hop, neosoul, reggae, dancehall, and more 
with DJ Jerry Ross. 

Vibes’N’Stuff El Amigo Bar, 3355 Mission, 
SF; (415) 852-0092. 10pm, free. Conscious 
jazz and hip-hop with DJs Luce Lucy, Vinnie 
Esparza, and more. 

TUESDAY 11 


ROCK/BLUES/HIP-HOP 

Beautiful Machines, Return to Mono, 
Roosevelt Radio, Destro F8, 1192 Folsom, 
SF; eventbee.com/v/beautifulmachines. 
8pm, $8. 

“Blue Bear School of Music Showcase” 

Cafe Du Nord. 7:30pm, $12-$20. 

Johnny Boyd, Stompy Jones Verdi Club, 
2424 Mariposa, SF; www.verdiclub.net. 


Chris Robinson Brotherhood Great 
American Music Hall. 9pm, $31. 

North Fork, Scatter Gather, one f Hemlock 
Tavern. 8:30pm, $6. 

Guitar Shorty Biscuitsand Blues. 8and 
10pm, $20. 

Lavender Diamond Chapel, 777Valencia, 
SF; www.thechapelsf.com. 9pm, $10-$12, 
all ages. 

Major Powers and the Lo-Fi Symphony 

Amnesia. 9pm. 

Stan Erhart Band Johnny Foley’s. 9pm, free. 

Sword, Gypsyhawk, American Sharks 

Independent. 8pm, $22. 

Nathan Temby vs Lee Huff Johnny Foley’s 
Dueling Pianos. 9pm, free. 

JAZZ/NEW MUSIC 

Bombshell Betty and her Burlesqueteers 


Elbo Room. 9pm, $10. 

Melvin Rhyne, CCSF Jazz Band Fall 
Concert San Francisco City College, Diego 
Rivera Theater, 50 Phelan, SF; www.ccsf.edu 
. 8-10pm. 

DANCE CLUBS 

Stylus John Colins Lounge, 138 Minna, SF; 
www.johncolins.com. 9pm. Hip-hop, dance¬ 
hall, and Bay slaps with DJ Left Lane. 

Takin’ Back Tuesdays Double Dutch, 3192 
16th St,SF; www.thedoubledutch.com. 9pm, 
free. Hip-hop from the 1990s. sfbg 



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34 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 



POLLO DEL MAR, HEKLINA, MATTHEW MARTIN, AND COOKIE DOUGH IN 
THE GOLDEN GIRLS: THE CHRISTMAS EPISODES. PHOTO BY JOSE GUZMAN COLON 


Stage listings are compiled by Guardian staff. 
Performance times may change; call venues to con¬ 
firm. Reviewers are Robert Avila, Rita Felciano, and 
Nicole Gluckstern. Submit items for the listings at 
listings@sfbg.com. Forfurther information on how 
to submit items forthe listings, see Picks. 

THEATER 


OPENING 

The Golden Girls: The Christmas Episodes 

Victoria Theatre, 2961 16th St, SF; www.tran- 
nyshack.com. $30. OpensThu/6,8pm. Runs 
Thu-Sat, 8pm; Sun, 7pm. Through Dec 30. Four 
drag queens + The Golden Girls + Christmas = 
holiday magic. 

Hedwig and the Angry Inch Boxcar Playhouse, 
505 Natoma, SF; www.boxcartheatre.org. $25-35. 
Opens Wed/5,8pm. Runs Wed-Sat, 8pm (also Sat, 
5pm). Through Jan 26. Boxcar’s popular produc¬ 
tion of John Cameron Mitchell’s glam-rock musical 
returns, starringa rotatingcast of Hedwigs. 

“A Minor Cycle: Five Little Plays in One Starry 
Night” NOHspace, Project Artaud, 2840 Mariposa, 
SF; www.theatreofyugen.org. $10-30. Previews 
Tue/11, 7pm. Opens Wed/12, 7pm. RunsWed-Thu, 
7pm; Fri-Sat, 8pm; Sun, 1pm. Through Dec 30. 
Theatre of Yugen presents the world premiere of 
five one-act plays based on tales of childhood, inter¬ 
preted though traditional Japanese artistry. 

“The San Francisco Olympians Festival” Exit 
Theater, 156 Eddy, SF; www.sfolympians.com. 

$10. Opens Wed/5,8pm. Runs Wed-Sat, 8pm (also 
Sat, 2pm). Through Dec 20. This 12-night festival 
features brand-new plays by Bay Area writers, each 
based on one of the 12 Olympian gods of ancient 
Greece. 

ONGOING 

A Christmas Carol Geary Theater, 415 Geary, 

SF; www.act-sf.org. $20-95. Tue-Sat, 7pm (no 
evening performance Thu/6, Tue/11, or Dec 18; 
also 2pm matinees Sat/8, Dec 12,15, 21, and 22; 
Sun, 5:30pm (also 1pm matinees Sun/9, Dec 16, 
and 23); Dec 24,1pm. Through Dec 24. American 
Conservatory Theater’s annual holiday performance 
features James Carpenter as Scrooge. 

Foodies! The Musical Shelton Theater, 533 
Sutter, SF; www.foodiesthemusical.com. $30-34. 
Fri-Sat, 8pm. Open-ended. AWAT Productions 
presents Morris Bobrow’s musical comedy revue all 
aboutfood. 

History: The Musical Un-Scripted Theater, 

533 Sutter, SF; www.un-scripted.com. $10-20. 
Thu-Sat, 8pm. Through Dec 22. The Un-Scripted 
Theater Company performs “an unscripted romp 
through Western history.” 

Hysterical, Historical San Francisco: Holiday 
Edition Alcove Theater, 414 Mason, Ste 502, SF; 
www.thealcovetheater.com. $25-40. Fri-Sat and 
Dec 26-31, 9pm. Through Dec 31. Comedian Kurt 
Weitzmann takes on San Francisco history, adding 
some holiday flair alongthe way. 

The Marvelous Wonderettes New Conservatory 
Theatre Center, 25 Van Ness, SF; www.nctcsf. 
org. $27-46. Previews Wed/5-Fri/7,8pm. Opens 
Sat/8,8pm. Runs Wed-Sat, 8pm; Sun, 2pm (no 
show Dec 23). Through Jan 13. New Conservatory 
Theatre Center performs Roger Bean’s 1950s pop- 
hit musical. 

The New California Traveling Jewish Theater, 470 
Florida, SF; www.pianofight.com. $20-25. Wed, 
8pm. Through Dec 19. PianoFight Productions’ 
female-centric sketch comedy group ForePlays 
presents an all-new variety show. 

Open Shotwell Studios, 3252 19th St, SF; www. 
brownpapertickets.com. $20. Fri-Sat and Mon, 
8pm. Through Dec 17. A married couple decides to 
open uptheirrelationship in BackAlleyTheaterand 


Footloose’s production of Jeff Bedillion’s comedy 
for mature audiences. 

Pal Joey Eureka Theatre, 215 Jackson, SF; 
www.42ndstreetmoon.org. $25-75. Wed, 7pm; 
Thu-Fri, 8pm; Sat, 6pm; Sun, 3pm. Through Dec 
16.42nd Street Moon performs the Rodgers and 
Hart classic. 

The Rainmaker Shelton Theater, 533 Sutter, 

SF; www.sheltontheater.org. $38. Fri-Sat, 8pm. 
Through Dec 22. Shelton Theatre preforms N. 
Richard Nash’s classic drama. 

Slugs and Kicks Thick House, 1695 18th St, SF; 
www.therhino.org. $15-30. Wed/5-Sat/8,8pm; 
Sun/9, 3pm. Theatre Rhinoceros performs John 
Fisher’s play about the offstage drama at a college 
theater company. 

Speed-the-Plow ActorsTheatre of San Francisco, 
855 Bush, SF; www.actorstheatresf.org. $26-38. 
Wed-Sat, 8pm. Extended through Dec 21. Actors 
Theatre of San Francisco performs the David Mamet 
drama. 

The Submission New Conservatory Theatre 
Center, 25 Van Ness, SF; www.nctcsf.org. $25-45. 
Wed-Sat, 8pm; Sun, 2pm. Through Dec 16. New 
Conservatory Theatre Center performs Jeff Talbott’s 
drama about a playwright who falsifies his identity 
when he enters his latest work into a prestigious 
theater festival. 

BAY AREA 

Dracula Berkeley Community Church, 1802 
Fairview, Berk; www.infernotheatre.org. $12-25. 
Thu and Sat-Sun, 8pm; Fri, 9pm. Though Dec 16. 
Inferno Theatre Company performs GiulioCesare 
Perrone’s adaptation of the Bram Stoker classic. 

It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play Marin 
Theatre Company, 397 Miller, Mill Valley; www. 
marintheatre.org. $36-57. Tue and Thu-Sat, 8pm 
(alsoThu/6, 1pm; Dec 15, 2pm); Wed, 7:30pm; 

Sun, 2 and 7pm. Through Dec 16. Marin Theatre 
Company performs Joe Landry’s live radio play 
adaptation of the classic Capra film. 

Toil and Trouble La Val’sSubterranean, 1834 
Euclid, Berk; www.impacttheatre.com. $10-20. 
Thu/6-Sat/8,8pm. Foratheatercompany known 
for its radical interpretations of the Shakespearean 
canon, a play such as Lauren Gunderson’s Toil 
and Trouble, a goofy Generation Why retelling 
of Macbeth, is a particularly good fitfor Impact 
Theatre. Whittled down to a dynamic three-char¬ 
acter chamber play featuring delusionary slackers 
plottingtoturn their MBAsand nebulousSF Giants 
connections into a bloodless takeover of a remote 
island nation ratherthan get crappy cafe jobs to pay 
the rent, 7"o//throws baseball, investors, Wikipedia, 
fortune cookies, hypothetical sex, and real violence 
into one cauldron, lettingthem bubble and froth 
throughoutthe piece. (Gluckstern) 

The White Snake Berkeley Repertory Theatre, 
RodaTheatre, 2025 Addison, Berk; www.berke- 
leyrep.org. $29-99. Tue and Thu-Sat, 8pm (also Sat 
and Dec 13, 2pm); Sun, 2 and 7pm. Through Dec 
23. In MaryZimmerman’s The White Snake, noth¬ 
ing is quite as it seems. A mysterious stranger and 
herfaithful servantare, in reality, a pairof shape- 
shiftingserpents, the humble village pharmacy they 
build (with stolen money) is a front fortheir magical 
healing powers, a venerated Buddhist Abbott is 
actually a small-minded tyrant with a remarkably 
unholy obsession. Based on a Chinese myth dat- 
ingtothe 10th century, Zimmerman’streatment 
weaves together fanciful design, elements of 
Chinese drama, and a stirring reflection on the 
transformative powerof love. (Gluckstern) 

Woyzeck Ashby Stage, 1901 Ashby, Berk; www. 
shotgunplayers.org. $23-35. Previews Wed/5- 
Thu/6, 7pm. Opens Fri/7,8pm. RunsWed-Thu, 

7pm; Fri-Sat, 8pm; Sun, 5pm. Through Jan 27. 
Shotgun Players presents Tom Waits, Kathleen 
Brennan, and RobertWilson’stragic musical, based 
on an unfinished 1837 play by Georg Buchner, sfbg 


Listings compiled by George Mclntire. Submit items 
forthelistingsatlistings@sfbg.com. Forfurther 
information on howto submit items forthe listings, 
see Picks. 

WEDNESDAY 5 

“Hidden in Plain Bite: Overlooked 
Opportunities for Food System Reform” 371 

10th St., SF. (323) 828-7040, www.ffacoalition. 
org. 6:30-9pm, $8-12. Come forthis informative 
and eye-opening discussion that tackles new and 
innovative measures to reform our dastardly food 
system. Organic food offerings and a silent auction 
will followthetalk. 

Lemony SnicketThe Booksmith, 1644 Haight, 

SF. (415) 863-8688, www.booksmith.com. 
5-8pm, free. Beleaguered children’s book hero 
LemonySnicketwill be on hand at the Booksmith 
this evening for a meet and greet promoting his 
latest effort, entitled Who Could That Be at 
This Hour? 

FRIDAY 7 

“Terra e Asfalfo: Around the World on a Vespa” 

The Emerald Tablet, 80 Fresno, SF. (415) 500- 
2323, www.terraeasfalto.it. Through Dec. 16. 
Opening reception: 6-10pm, free. Howanyonecan 
travel all around the world on those speedy little cos¬ 
mopolitan numbers is beyond us. But Italian couple 
Giorgio Serafinoand Giuliana Foresi did it — and 
theduowill be presentingtheirtravelsviathisphoto 
exhibit, where pictures of destinations such as 
Thailand, South Africa, and Italy will beondisplay. 
Mission Holiday Block Party Various businesses 
on Valencia from 23rd to 14th Sts. and surrounding 
blocks, SF. www.valenciastreetsf.com. 5-10pm, 
free. Get half price on sangria at Locanda, 20 
percent off clothes and accessories at Five and 
Diamond (whileShovel Man plays!), checkout 
a George Chen-hosted comedy program at Lost 
Weekend Video’s CineCave and more at this holiday 
celebration in Valencia’s neighborly businesses. 
“Snapshot” Southern Exposure, 3030 20th St., 
SF. (415) 863-2141, www.soex.org. Through 
Dec/20. Opening reception: 7-9pm, free. The 
Youth Advisory Board of Southern Exposure’s 
new exhibit explores the relationship between the 
medium of photography and the notion of memory. 
An experimental work, “Snapshot” features young 
artists’ take on fact and fiction through digital 
manipulation. 

“Aloha on Ice” Embarcadero ice rink, Justin 
Herman Plaza, SF. (415) 392-2235, tinyurl.com/ 
alohaonice. 4-7pm, free. Come bask in the warm 
aloha spirit at this pop-up luau. You’ll have a number 
of ways to get tropical at this event, like sampling 
Hawaiian food, making fresh flower leis, and mug¬ 
ging in a Hawaii-kitsch photo booth. Drink umbrellas 
and hellacious sunglasses tan notincluded. 

DIY Library Party Mission Bay Branch Library, 
960 Fourth St., SF. (415) 626-7512, www. 
friendssfpl.org. 7-10pm, free for members and 
friendsof members, $35 for membership. The 
DIY aesthetic has permeated nearly all facets of 
ourcontemporary culture, so it’s pasttime for our 
local library to get in on the low budget fun. Get 
engrossed by an impromptu arts and crafts proj¬ 


ect, and mingle with cocktail-sipping fellow literary 
fans at this free event. 

Hurricane Sandy Benefit Show Modern Eden 
Gallery, 403 Francisco, SF. www.hope-beyond. 
com. 6-9pm, free. We on the West Coast are lucky 
to not have to deal with terrors of hurricanes, which 
is why we urge to attend this art show benefitingour 
fellow Americans on the other side of the nation. 

SATURDAY 8 

East Bay Alternative Book and Zine Fest 

Berkeley City College, 2050 Center, Berk. 
eastbayalternativepressbookfair.blogspot.com. 
10am-5pm, free. The good folks behind this event 
decided to go bigger with the third installment 
of the East Bay Alternative Book and Zine fest. 
There’ll be workshops on zines, screen-printing, 
letterpress, and comic illustration in addition to 
speeches from dozens of local writers. 

Vagabond Indie Craft Fair Urban Bazaar, 1371 
Ninth Ave., SF. (415) 664-4422, www.urbanba- 
zaarsf.com. Also Dec/9. Noon-6:30pm, free. Etsy 
addicts take note! Urban Bazaar in conjunction 
with Etsy and the SF Etsy team will beputtingthe 
third annual holiday-themed Vagabond Indie Craft 
Fair. Come peruse with your keen shopper’s eye 
the emporium of hip, fun, and crafty items. Also 
probably a good idea to do some holiday shopping 
while you’re at it. 

Holiday Indie Mart Speakeasy Brewery, 1195 
Evans, SF. www.indie-mart.com. Noon-6pm, free. 
If you’ve never made it out to Speakeasy’s Bayview 
brew factory, now’sthe perfect time. Indie Mart 
is assemblingover45 vendors, who will come 
equipped with DIY giftablesyou’ll be stocked on 
foryourfamily and friends. Bonus round: today the 
brewery will unveil its new taproom, designed by 
Indie Mart creator Kelly Maloneand friends. 

KPFA Crafts Fair Concourse Exhibition Center, 
635 Eighth St., SF. (510) 848-6767 ext. 646, 
www.kpfa.org/craftsfair. Also Dec/9.10am-6pm, 
free-$10. Go to the Vagabond Crafts Fairon 
Saturday and the KPFA Crafts Fairon Sunday, 
or vice versa or do a crafts fair crawl by attending 
both on the same day! Sponsored by the progres¬ 
sive-minded folkatthe KPFA 94.1 radio station in 
Berkeley, thisfestivity isgoingall out by bringing 
craftworkfrom over 200 local artisans featuring 
glass, leather, and stone items. 

MONDAY 10 

Pladra Holiday Launch 5-8pm, free. Ill 
Minna, SF. www.pladra.com SF flannel company 
Pladra shows off its latest line of shirts for men 
and women at this holiday party and trunk show. 
Everything’s sourced and made in the Bay Area, for 
a hyperlocal, winter-ready shopping experience. 

TUESDAY 11 

A Long Day’s Evening Translation City Lights 
Bookstore, 261 Columbus, SF. (415) 362-1901, 
www.citylights.com. 7pm, free. Turkish experi¬ 
mental modernists rejoice! Aron Aji has finally 
translated A Long Day’s EVen/ngby Bilge Karasu 
for our literary loving. Attend thistalktoday by Aji 
to hear how the process took shape, sfbg 



EDITORIALS 


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FILM LISTINGS 


Film listings are edited by Cheryl Eddy. Reviewers 
are Kimberly Chun, Dennis Harvey, Lynn Rapoport, 
and Sara Vizcarrondo. For rep house showtimes, 
see Rep Clock. For complete film listings, seewww. 
sfbg.com. 

OPENING 

Generation P When Babylen Tatarsky (Vladimir 
Epifantsev) meets an old friend by chance, he’s 
plucked from penny-ante street level entrepeneur- 
ship into the much higher stakes of advertising in 
early 1990s Russia — a brave new world of post- 
Communist consumerist capitalism bent on out- 
performingthe West’s, in which new corrupt orders 
replace the old ones with dizzying speed. His rise 
from humble copy writerto a “living god” controlling 
mass reality one commercial at a time is accompa¬ 
nied by a whole lot of recreational drug use, mafia- 
style violence, and references to Mesopotamian 
mythology. Adapted from Victor Pelevin’s 1999 
novel (published in the US as Homo Zapiens ), 

Victor Ginzburg’s film preserves its heady, gonzomix 
of Pynchon, cyberpunk, and Putney Swope (1969) 
as a satirical conspiracy fantasia in which excess is 
both the style and the subject. No doubt at least half 
the in-jokes are lost on non-Russian audiences, but 
Generation Pis so dense and hyperactive you’ll be 
entertained by its fabulist sociopolitical onslaught 
regardless. (1:52) Embarcadero. (Harvey) 

In the Family See “Fatherand Law.” (2:49) Opera 
Plaza. 

North Sea Texas Growing up is never easy —espe¬ 
cially when you know who you are and who you love 
from a tenderyoungage, and live in a sleepy Belgium 
coastal hamlet in the early 70s. Sexual freedom 
begins at home, as filmmaker Bavo Defurne’s debut 
feature opens on our beautiful little protagonist, Pirn 
— a melancholy, shy, diligent soul who has a talent 
for drawing, a responsible nature, and a yen for ritual 
dress-up in lipstick and lace. He has an over-the-top 
role model: an accordion-playing, zaftig motherwho 
has a rep as the village floozy. Left alone far too often 
as his mom parties at a bar named Texas, Pirn takes 
refuge with kindly single-mom neighbor Marcella, her 
earnest daughter, and her sexy, motorcycle-loving son, 
Gino, who turns out to be just Pirn’s speed. But this 
childhood idyll is under threat: Gino’s new girlfriend 
and a handsome new boarderat Pirn’s house promise 
to change everything. Displaying a gentle, empathetic 
touch for his cast of mildly quirky characters and a 
genuine knackforconjuringthose long, sensual days 
of youth, Defurne manages to shine a fresh, romantic 
lightonasomewhatfamiliarbildungsroman, leavinga 
lingering taste of sea salt and sweat along with the feel¬ 
ing of walking in one young boy’s very specific shoes. 
(1:36) Opera Plaza, Shattuck. (Chun) 

Playing For Keeps Gerard Butler plays a former 
sports starwhoaimsto redeem himself by coaching 
his kid’s soccerteam. (1:46) 

“The Vortex Apocalypse, or How I Learned to 
Stop Worrying and Love Thursday Film Cult” 

With a respectful nod to the Mayans, the Vortex sees 
off 2012 with four weeks of movies depicting end- 
of-the-world-as-we-know-it scenarios. First up is an 
interesting duo from 1974. In Chosen Survivors, 11 



EDITORIALS! NEWS | FOOD + DRINK 


BELGIAN COMING-OF-AGE DRAMA 
NORTH SEA TEXAS OPENS FRI/7. 



strangers selected fortheir particular knowledge and 
skills are taken to an elaborate government bunker 
deep beneath the desert. They’re told they’re among 
several such groups in different secret locations 
chosen to preserve the human race in the immediate 
aftermath of total thermonuclearwar. This is pretty 
hard to take, alongwith the notion that they’ll be 
spending at least the next five years in this very 1970s 
silver discotheque-spaceship environ. But soon the 
chosen few have an even more jarring crisis to deal 
with: the scientists who devised this sunken fortress 
neglected to note it is surrounded by caves filled with 
hungryvampire bats. There’s a very bigtwist at the 
one-hour point, but just when this rare theatrical 
feature by TV director Sutton Roley (7T7e Man From 
U.N.C.L.E., Airwolf, etc.) should kick into high 
gear, it actually seemstoslowdown. Still, there are a 
couple very tense sequences, and some interesting 
character fillips. The co-feature is The Last Days of 
Planet Earth a.k.a. Prophecies of Nostradamus, a 
Japanese superproduction that aimed to top both the 
then-prominentdisaster movie genre and the strain 
of eco-horrordominatingmuch of 1970s fantasy 
cinema. In addition to the expected earthquakes, 
tsunamis, and such, Earth’s meltdown triggers 
such phenomena as pterodactyl-sized vampire bats 
(again!) and bird-eating flowers. ToshioMasuda’s 
special effects spectacular also features a really weird 
modern dance performance, and — in the editorially 
butchered, atrociously dubbed US release version 
— dialogue like “But by not allowing them to live, 
you’re... killing them! ” Vortex Room. (Harvey) 
Waiting for Lightning The first voice you hearin 
Waiting for Lightning is pro skateboarder Danny 
Way’s mother: “I said, ‘Are you crazy ? What do you 
thinkyou’re doing?”’ Can’t really blame herforworry- 


ing: Waiting for Lightning is a bio-doc following the 
fearless Way’s rise from littlest squirt at the Del Mar 
skate park to his determined quest to jump over the 
Great Wall of China in 2005. Growing up, he faced 
problems (his dad was killed in jail; his mom partied 
... a lot; his mentor died in a car crash; he suffered 
a broken neck after a surfing accident), but perse¬ 
vered to find his calling, pursuingwhata peer calls 
“life-and-death stuntman shit.” Like all docs about 
skateboarding — a sport that depends so much on 
cameras standing by — there’s no shortage of action 
footage, and big names like Tony Hawk and Christian 
Hosoi drop by to heap praise on Way’s talents and 
work ethic. Lightning is aimed mostly at an audience 
already fond of watching skate footage; it lacks the 
artistic heft of 2001’s Dogtown and Z-Boys, or the 
unusually compelling narrative of 2003’s Stoked: 
The Rise and Fall of Gator, and the whole “Way is a 
golden god ” theme gets a little tiresome. But it must 
be said: the Great Wall jump — a self-mythologizing 
publicity stunt that would do Evel Knievel proud — is 
rather spectacular. (1:32) Metreon. (Eddy) 

ONGOING 

The Collection As soon as you behold the neon sign 
“Hotel Argento” shiningoverthegrim warehouse- 
cum-evil dead trap, you know exactly what you’re in 
for — a wink, and even a little bit of a horror superfan’s 
giggle. In other words, to tweakthat killer Roach Motel 
tagline: kidscheckin, butthey don’t check out. No 
need to see 2009’s The Collector— the previous 
movie by director-cowriter Marcus Dunstan and writer 
Patrick Melton (winners of the third season of Project 
Green light, now with the screenplays for multiple 
Saw films beneath their collective belt) — the 


“YOU’VE NEVER SEEN IMAGES LIKE 
THIS BEFORE... IT DESERVES TO BE 
SEEN AND FELT ON THE BIG SCREEN” 

-ROBERT REDFORD 


ILfNbANCC 


“STUNNING IMAGES...TIMELY... A SOLITARY 
QUEST WITH GLOBAL IMPLICATIONS” 

- Neil Genzlinger, THE NEW YORK TIMES 

“VISUALLY BREATHTAKING” 

-lustin Chang, VARIETY 

“ONE OFTHE MOST BEAUTIFUL 
FILMS OF THE YEAR” 

- Regina Weinreich,THE HUFFINGTON POST 

- Joe Neumaier, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS 



Sbc-NcUt jlork Sintcs 

0 Critic's Pick 


CHASING ICE 


A FILM BY JEFF ORLOWSKI 

exposure Q g deluxI 

www.chasingice.com • www.submarinedeluxe.com 

NOW PLAY ING 

ALSO AT 

i- I l r* L LANDMARK'S CALIFORNIA 

Embarcadero Center rafael film center 

One Embarcadero Center • (415) 267-4893 


PG-13 


A VICTOR GINZBURG FILM 

%3€N€RAT!0NP 


“★★★★ A KEYHOLE INTO 
THE FUTURE OF THE WORLD.” 


TIME OUT NEW YORK 


“A BRAVE, HEAD-SPINNING 
COMMENTARY ON THE POTENCY 
OF ADVERTISING AND 
THE SEDUCTION OF THE SOUL.” 

THE NEWYORKTIMES 



facebook.com/GenerationP 


STARTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7 


LANDMARK THEATRES 


Embarcadero Center 

One Embarcadero Center ■ (415) 267-4893 


ALSO AT: 

RIALTO CINEMAS 
ELMWOOD 


Q&A with DIRECTOR VICTOR GINZBURG on FRIDAY 12/7 
following the 7pm SHOW at the EMBARCADERO and 
the 8:45pm SHOW at the ELMWOOD. 


giallofanboyand gorehound hallmarks are there for 
all to enjoy: tarantulas (straight from 1981’s The 
Beyond ), a factory kitted out as an elaborate murder 
machine, and end credits that capture characters’ 
last moments. Plus, plenty of fast-paced shocks and 
seemingly endless splatter, with a heavy sprinkle of 
wince-inducingcompoundfractures. The Collection 
ups the first film’s ante, as gamine Elena (Emma 
Fitzpatrick) is lured to go dancing with her pals. Their 
underground party turns out to be way beyond the 
fringe, as the killer mows down the dance floor, liter¬ 
ally, and gives the phrase “teen crush” a bloody new 
spin. Stumbling on The Collector's antihero thief 
Arkin (Josh Stewart) locked in a box, Elena releases 
him but can’t prevent her own capture, so killer-body- 
guard Lucello (Oz’s LeeTergesen) snatches Arkin 
from the hospital and forces him to lead his team of 
toughsthrough a not-so-funhouseteemingwith booby 
trapsaswellasvictims-turned-insidious-weapons. All 
of which almost convinces you of nutty-nutball genius 
of the masked, dilated-pupiled Collector (here stunt¬ 
man Randall Archer), who takes trendy taxidermy to 
icky extremes — even when his mechanism is threat¬ 
ened by a way smart last girl and a lock picker who’s 
adept at cracking buildingcodes. Despite Dunstan’s 
obvious devotion to horror-movie landmarks, The 
Collection doesn’t turn out to be particularly original: 
rather, it attempts to stand on the shoulders — and 
arms and dismembered body parts — of others, in 
hopes of finding its place on a nonexistent drive-in 
bill. (1:23) Metreon, 1000 Van Ness. (Chun) 

Killing Them Softly Lowest-level criminal fuck- 


wits Frankie (Scoot McNairy) and Russell (Ben 
Mendelsohn) are hired to rob a mob gambling 
den, a task which miraculously they fail to blow. 
Nevertheless, the repercussions are swift and harsh, 
as a middleman suit (Richard Jenkins) to the unseen 
bosses brings in one hitman (Brad Pitt), who brings 
in another (James Gandolfini) to figure out who the 
thieves are and administer extreme justice. Based 
on a 1970s novel by George V. Higgins, this latest 
collaboration by Pitt and director-scenarist Andrew 
Dominikwouldappearsuperficiallyto bea surer com¬ 
mercial bet after the box-office failure of their last, 
2007’s The Assassination of Jesse James By 
the Coward Robert Ford— one of the great films 
of the last decade. But if you’re looking for action 
thrills or even Guy Ritchie-style swaggering mantalk 
(though there is some of that), you’ll be disappointed 
to find Killingmore in the abstracted crime drama 
arena of Drive (2011) or The American (2010), 
landing somewhere between the riveting former 
and the arid latter. This meticulously crafted tale is 
never less than compelling in imaginative direction 
and expert performance, but it still carries a certain 
unshakable air of so-what. Some may be turned off 
by just how vividly unpleasant Mendelsohn’s junkie 
and Gandolfini’salchieare. Others will shrugat the 
wisdom of re-setting this story in the fall of 2008, 
with financial-infrastructure collapse and the hol¬ 
low promise of President-elect Obama’s “Change” 
providing ironical background noise. It’s all a little too 
little, too soon. (1:37) Four Star, Marina, Metreon, 
1000 Van Ness. (Harvey) sfbg 


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PICKS 


ARTS + CULTURE 


MUSIC LISTINGS 


STAGE LISTINGS 


ON THE CHEAP 


FILM LISTINGS 


CLASSIFIEDS 


DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 / SFBG.COM 35 







































































AN EPIC JOURNEY. AN IMPOSSIBLE DREAM. THE BIRTH OF A LEGEND. 


WAITINGFORLIGHTNINGTHiMOVIE.COM/FACiBOOK.COM/WAITINGFORUGHTNING 


EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT 
STARTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7 


AMC LOEWS METREON 16 

101 4th Street, San Francisco 
(888) AMC-4FUN 


FILM LISTINGS 


GEORGES FRANJU’S HAUNTING EYES WITHOUT A FACE (1960) 
PLAYS THE PACIFIC FILM ARCHIVE. 


REP CLOCK 

Schedules are forWed/5-Tue/ll except where 
noted. Directorandyearare given when available. 
Double and triple features marked with a •. All times 
pm unless otherwise specified. 

ABCO ARTSPACE 3135 Filbert, Oakl; www.everything- 
isterrible.com. $10. “Everything is Terrible! Holiday 
Special!,” found-footage video collage, Sat, 10. 
“ANOTHER HOLE IN THE HEAD FILM FESTIVAL” 
Terra Gallery, 511 Harrison, SF; Roxie, 3117 16th 
St, SF; Victoria, 2961 16th St; and Vortex Room, 
1082 Howard, SF; www.sfindie.com. Ninth annual 
festival of genre films, with 28 features and 26 
shorts, Wed-Sun. 

ANSWER COALITION 2969 Mission, SF; www. 


answersf.org. $5-10. Occupy the Bay (Riley, 

2012), Thu, 7. 

ARTISTS’ TELEVISION ACCESS 992 Valencia, SF; 
www.atasite.org. $6. “OtherCinema:” works by 
Jeremy Rourke, Ben Wood, and others celebrating 
forgotten formats and media archaeology, Sat, 8:30. 
BALBOA 3630 Balboa, SF; www.cinemasf.com. 
$10. •Remembering Playland at the Beach 
(Wyrsch, 2010), Sat, noon, and Sutro’s: The 
Palace at Lands End (Wyrsch, 2011), Sat, 1:30. 
With director Tom Wyrsch in person. 

CASTRO 429 Castro, SF; (415) 621-6120, www. 
castrotheatre.com. $8.50-11. »Get Carter 
(Hodges, 1971), Wed, 2:40, 7, and The Trip 
(Winterbottom, 2010), Wed, 4:50,9:10. Mystical 
Traveler: The Life and Times of Dr. John-Roger 


(2013), Thu, 7:30. Thisevent, $10; preceded by 
free video seminars from Dr. John-Roger, Thu, 
9am-6pm. Moreinfoatwww.mysticaltraveler.com. 
“Midnitesfor Maniacs: No Pain NoGainTriple Bill:" 
•Bring It On (Reed, 2000), Fri, 7:30; Hairspray 
(Waters, 1988), Fri, 9:30; and Kickboxer (DiSalle, 
1989), Fri, 11:30. Samsara (Fricke, 2011), Sat- 
Sun, 2,4:30, 7, 9:15. “Rick Prelinger Presents Lost 
Landscapes of San Francisco 7,” Tue, 7:30. More 
info atwww.longnow.org. 


CHRISTOPHER B. SMITH RAFAEL FILM CENTER 

1118 Fourth St, San Rafael; (415) 454-1222, 
www.cafilm.org. $6.75-$10.25. A Late Quartet 
(Zilberman, 2012), call for dates and times. A 
Royal Affair (Arcel, 2012), call fordates and times. 
“Pierre Etaix: Lost and Found:” Le Grand Amour 
(1969) with “Happy Anniversary” (1962), Fri and 
Dec 13,6:45 (also Fri, 4:30); The Suitor (1963) 
with “Rupture” (1961), Fri, 9; Sat, 2; Tue, 8:30; 

Yo Yo (1965), Sun, 5, 7:15; Dec 12,8:30; As Long 


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IN THE FAMILY 

INDEPENDENT SPIRIT AWARD NOMINEE 


STARTS FRIDAY, 
DECEMBER 7 


Writer Di rector 8 nd Lead Actor PAIBICK WANG will appear in person on Fri.. 12/7 el Hie 
Opera Plaza end on Sal. 12/8 el (he Camera 3. VisitUiealre websites ter details. 


_ ALS o at 

P p f a D | a 7 a CAMERA 3 

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A COMPELLING AND INSPIRING TALE. 


Noah Leo, FILM THREAT 


RELENTLESS PASSION 
AND INSANECOURAGE 

DANNY WAY IS A HERO 
FOR THE GENERATIONS. 


- Miri Jedeikin, EP Daily 


WORLD ,£S 

premiere ^ OFFICIAL SELECTION 

* hQtDOCS 


Li 


WAITIHGro. 
LIGHTNING 


|pp-i 3 i 5 », 30 ' 


Q&A WITH DIRECTOR IAC0R ROSENBERG SATURDAY AFTER 4:40 & 7:10PM SHOWS! 


As You’re Healthy (1966) with “Feeling Good” 

(1969), Tue, 6:45; Dec 13,9; Land of Milk and 
Honey (1971), Dec 12,6:45. “Mysteries of the 
Krell: Makingthe Sci-Fi Epic Forbidden Planet," 
Sat, 7.Thisevent, $12. White Christmas (Curtiz, 
1954), Sun, 1. “A Century Ago: The Films of 1912,” 
presented on a vintage projector with live accompa¬ 
niment, Mon, 7. Thisevent, $12. 

PACIFIC FILM ARCHIVE 2575 Bancroft, Berk; 

(510) 642-5249, bampfa.berkeley.edu. $5.50- 
9.50. “Day With(out) Art:” United in Anger: A 
History of ACT UP (Hubbard, 2012), Wed, 7. 
"Grand Illusions: French Cinema Classics, 1928- 
1960:” Crime and Punishment (Chenal, 1935), 
Thu, 7; Port of Shadows (Came, 1938), Fri, 7; 

Eyes Without a Face (Franju, 1960), Fri, 8:50; 

Les orgueilleux (Allegret, 1953), Sun, 3; Carnival 
in Flanders (Feyder, 1935), Sun, 5. “Wild at Heart: 
Barry Gifford:” Lost Highway (Lynch, 1997), Sat, 

6 ; Perdita Durango (dela Iglesia, 1997), Sat, 9:10. 
ROXIE 3117 and 3125 16th St, SF; (415) 863- 
1087, www.roxie.com. $6.50-11. Another Hole in 
the Head Film Festival, Wed-Fri. Visitwww.sfindie. 
com forcompleteschedule. Just 45 Minutes from 
Broadway (Jaglom, 2012), Wed-Thu, 7,9:15. 

SF CINEMATHEQUE San Francisco Museum of 
Modern Art, 151 Third St, SF; www.sfcinematheque. 
org. $10. “Shifting Geographies/Special Relativity:” 
Deep State (Butlerand Mirza, 2012), with other 
works, presented in association with SFMOMA, Thu, 7. 
VORTEX ROOM 1082 Howard, SF; Facebook: The 
Vortex Room. $10. “The Vortex Apocalypse, or How 
I Learned to Stop Worryingand Love Thursday Film 
Cult:” •Chosen Survivors (Roley, 1974), Thu, 

9, and The Last Days of Planet Earth (Masuda, 
1974), Thu, 11. 

YERBA BUENA CENTER FOR THE ARTS 701 

Mission, SF; www.ybca.org. $8-10. “Honk If You’re 
Horny: Retro Sex Musicals:” Alice in Wonderland 
(Townsend, 1976), Thu, 7:30. Islam Unknown: 
Part Two (Elders, 2012), Sun, 2. sfbg 


FIRST RUN VENUES 

The following is contact information for Bay Area 
first-run theaters. 

Balboa 38th Ave/Balboa. 221-8184, www.bal- 
boamovies.com. 

Bridge Geary/Blake. 267-4893. 

Century Plaza Nooroff El Camino, South SF. (650) 
742-9200. 

Century 20 JuniperoSerra/John Daly, Daly City. 
(650) 994-7469. 

Clay Fillmore/Clay. 267-4893. 

Embarcadero 1 EmbarcaderoCenter, promenade 
level. 267-4893. 

Empire West Portal/Vicente. 661-2539. 

Four Star Clement/23rd Ave. 666-3488. 

Marina 2149 Chestnut, www.lntsf.com/marina_ 
theatre 

Metreon Fourth St/Mission. 1-800-FANDANGO. 
New People Cinema 1746 Post, www.newpeople- 
world.com. 

1000 Van Ness 1000 Van Ness. 1-800-231-3307. 
Opera Plaza Van Ness/Golden Gate. 267-4893. 
Presidio 2340 Chestnut. 776-2388. 

SF Center Mission between Fourth and Fifth Sts. 
538-8422. 

Stonestown 19th Ave/Winston. 221-8182. 

Sundance Kabuki Cinema Post/Fillmore. 929-4650. 
Vogue Sacramento/Presidio. 221-8183. 

OAKLAND 

Grand Lake 3200 Grand, Oakl. (510) 452-3556. 
Jack London Stadium 100 Washington, Jack 
London Square, Oakl. (510) 433-1320. 

Piedmont Piedmont/41stSt, Oakl. (510) 464-5980. 

BERKELEY AREA 

Albany 1115 Solano, Albany. (510)464-5980. 
AMC Bay Street 16 5614Shellmound, Emeryville. 
(510)457-4262. 

California Kittredge/Shattuck, Berk. (510)464-5980. 
Cerrito 10070 San Pablo, El Cerrito. (510) 972-9102. 
Emery Bay 6330 Christie, Emeryville. (510) 420-0107. 

Rialto Cinemas Elmwood 2966 College Ave. at 
Ashby, Berk. (510) 433-9730. 

Shattuck Cinemas 2230 Shattuck, Berk. 

(510) 464-5980. 

UA Berkeley 2274 Shattuck, Berk. 

(510) 843-1487. sfbg 


36 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN 


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LEGAL NOTICES 


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 
FILED NO. A034721800. The following person 
is doing business as The Boneyard, 360 
Barneveld San Francisco, CA 94124. This 
business is conducted by a general partner¬ 
ship. Registrant commenced business under 
the abovelisted fictitious business name on 
Nov. 15, 2012. Signed by Richard Mainzer. 
This statement was filed by Michael Jaldon, 
Deputy County Clerk, on Nov. 15, 2012. 
L#2021 Publication Dates: Nov. 21 28, Dec. 

5,12, 2012. 

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 
FILED NO. A034699700. The following 
person is doing business as Almanac, 
2639 Lombard St. San Francisco, CA 
94123. This business is conducted by a 
limited liability company. Registrant com¬ 
menced business under the abovelisted 
fictitious business name on Nov. 5, 2012. 
Signed by Adrian Albino. This statement 
was filed by Mariedyne L. Argente, Deputy 
County Clerk, on Nov. 5, 2012. L#2016, 
Publication Dates: Nov.14, 21, 28, Dec. 

5, 2012. 

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF 
NAME CASE NUMBER: CNC12549078. 
SUPERIOR COURT, 400 McAllister St. San 
Francisco, CA 94102. PETITION OF Doris 
Tao Chun LinSong for change of name. 

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner 
Doris Tao Chun LinSong filed a petition 
with this court for a decree changing 
names as follows: Present Name: Doris 
Tao Chun LinSong. Proposed Name: Doris 
LinSong. THE COURT ORDERS that all 
persons interested in this matter shall 
appear before this court at the hearing 
indicated below to show cause, if any, why 
the petition for change of name should 
not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING 
Date: 1/10/2013. Time: 9:00 AM, Room 
514. Signed by Donald Sullivan, Presiding 
Judge of Superior Court on Nov. 1, 2012. 
L#2018, Publication dates: Nov. 14, 21, 
28, Dec. 5, 2012. 

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 
FILED NO. A034660900. The following 
person is doing business as High Tailin Dog 
Walkin, 1362 Vermont St. San Francisco, 

CA 94110. This business is conducted by an 
individual. Registrant commenced business 
under the abovelisted fictitious business 
name on Oct. 19, 2012. Signed by Kristine 
Mill. This statement was filed by Jennifer 
Wong, Deputy County Clerk, on Oct. 19, 2012. 
L#2015, Publication Dates: Nov.14, 21 28, 
Dec. 5, 2012. 



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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF 
NAME CASE NUMBER: CNC12549005. SU¬ 
PERIOR COURT, 400 McAllister St. San Fran¬ 
cisco, CA 94102. PETITION OF Pierre Atchley 
for change of name. TO ALL INTERESTED 
PERSONS: Petitioner Pierre Atchley filed a 
petition with this court for a decree changing 
names as follows: Present Name: Pierre 
Atchley. Proposed Name: Pierre Aguirre. THE 
COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in 
this matter shall appear before this court at 
the hearing indicated below to show cause, 
if any, why the petition for change of name 
should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING 
Date: 12/11/2012. Time: 9:00 AM, Dept. 514. 
Signed by Donald Sullivan, Presiding Judge of 
Superior Court on Oct. 5, 2012. L#2017, Publi- 
cation dates: Nov. 14, 21 28, Dec. 5, 2012. 
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF 
NAME CASE NUMBER: CNC12549119. 
SUPERIOR COURT, 400 McAllister St. 

San Francisco, CA 94102. PETITION 
OF Roseanna Lea Turner for change of 
name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 
Petitioner Doris Tao Chun LinSong filed a 
petition with this court for a decree chang¬ 
ing names as follows: Present Name: 
Roseanna Lea Turner. Proposed Name: 
Roseanna Lea Lila. THE COURT ORDERS 
that all persons interested in this matter 
shall appear before this court at the 
hearing indicated below to show cause, if 
any, why the petition for change of name 
should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEAR¬ 
ING Date: 2/7/2013. Time: 9:00 AM, 
Room 514. Signed by Donald Sullivan, 
Presiding Judge of Superior Court on Nov. 
21, 2012. L#2024, Publication dates: 

Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 12, 19, 2012. 


NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC 
BEVERAGES. Date of Filing Application: 

Nov. 2, 2012. To Whom It May Concern: The 
name of the applicant is: Naser J Zakout. 

The applicant listed above is applying to The 
Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to 
sell alcoholic beverages at: 522 Sutter St. San 
Francisco, CA 941021102. Type of License 
Applied for: 21 - OFFSALE GENERAL. Publica- 
tion dates: Dec. 5,12,19, 2012; L#2026. 

MEDICAL 


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The Guardian's 
Best-Dressed Pet Contest 

In celebration of California Academy of Sciences’ annual holiday exhibit 7 'is 
the Season for Science - Share the wonder of winter, and see the amazing 
ways animals adapt to the season with live reindeer, indoor snow flurries, 
and more. Now through January 6. 



Show us your furry friends and scaly sidekicks donning 
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Photos with the most likes will win tickets to the Academy’s ’77s the Season 
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CALIFORNIA 
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PSYCHIC DREAM ASTROLOGY 


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DEC. 5-11, 2012 


SENSUAL MASSAGE 


ARIES 

March 21-April 19 

You don’t need to know what to do, 
Aries, so stop worrying so much. 

Your life is unfolding before you 
and the test at hand is how can you 
participate without being control¬ 
ling? Instead of making decisions 
and forgingahead, try enjoying the 
moment fro whatever it brings. Life is 
not a race. 

TAURUS 

April 20-May 20 

True leadership is not something 
wielded from on high, butwhata 
person does from within community. 
Don’t separate yourself from others 
and then try to control them oryour 
shared situation. Collaborate so that 
you can know whatwill work for all. 
Only then can you successfully direct 
this week. 

GEMINI 

May 21-June 21 

Don’t try to keep the peace if it’s time 
for war. Your relationships need some 
serious tending-to this week. You are 
meantto confrontyour fears, your 
needs and the compulsions that have 
been drivingyou. Don’ttry to control 
things; just be honest with yourself 
and share your truth with others. 

CANCER 

June 22-July 22 

Your life is pointed in the right direc¬ 
tion, but what you’re goingthrough 
may feel like hard stuff you’ve been 
through before and shouldn’t have to 
again. You are growing into yourself, 
Moonchild, and you mayjusthaveto 
feel the ways that you are small in your 
progress towards growing bigger. 

LEO 

July 23-Aug. 22 

Your ambiguities are your greatest 
teachers this week. It is the very stuff 
that you don’t knowthat istryingto 
clarify your path. Step willingly into 
the feelings of unrest that are plaguing 
you and tolerate theircrappy vibes; 
this is what is necessary if you are 
goingto see what lies beyond them. 

VIRGO 

Aug. 23-Sept. 22 

The best way to execute the much- 
needed changes in your life is by tak¬ 
ing it slow, Virgo. You are buildingan 
empire in this life, and if it’s not one 
that you love then what’s the point 
of it all? Make sure your life is going 
in the right direction by keepingyour 
heart open and your wits about you at 
every turn thisweek. 


LIBRA 

Sept. 23-0ct. 22 

Consider the needs of your heart 
before you over commit yourself this 
week. You’ve taken on too much and 
there’s no good in it, Libra. Instead of 
tying to do it all at once and as quickly 
as possible, try doing only what you 
can emotionally handle so you can get 
it right on the first try. 

SCORPIO 

Oct. 23-Nov. 21 

Don’ttry to fix things, Scorpio. Stop 
trying to understand what to do next 
or howto undo your past. How did the 
first person discovered that animal 
dung worked great as fertilizer? The 
kind of alchemical set of mistakes 
that led to that insight is what you 
should be gunning for; turn your crap 
to compost this week. 

SAGITTARIUS 

Nov. 22-Dec. 21 

Collect data, dear Sagittarius. It’s a 
good time to get a sense of what your 
friends and family think about you 
and your current situation. You need 
to trust in your gut and bean inde¬ 
pendent agentthis week, but coming 
to the answers that you need byway 
of research will help you to make the 
best choices. 

CAPRICORN 

Dec. 22-Jan. 19 

You can get what you want by main¬ 
taining a delicate balance between 
going with the flow and having a multi- 
staged plan that you are working on 
executing. Strive to be receptive this 
week so that you can pick upon the 
nuancesof what’s happening, and let 
them influence your well-laid plans. 

AQUARIUS 

Jan. 20-Feb. 18 

Turn your attention to what is working 
in your life, even if your troubles sur¬ 
round you thisweek. There’s possibili¬ 
ty inherent in all of yourtroubles, it just 
takes special effort to find it. By being 
emotionally present and honest you’ll 
be able to keep it together even when it 
feels like things are falling apart. 

PISCES 

Feb. 19-March 20 

To secure your world and makeita 
place you want to be this week you’ve 
gotta be yourself, Pisces. Its way 
too easy to play the role you believe 
is expected of you, or to water down 
your awesomeness in a misguided 
attempt to be supportive to others. 

Be real and let the goodness flow 
from there. 


BY JESSICA LANYADOO 

Jessica Lanyadoo has been a psychic dreamer for 18 years. Check out 
her Web site at www.lovelanyadoo.com or contact her for an astrology or 
intuitive reading at (415) 336-8354 or dreamyastrology@gmail.com. 



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